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Success in Life : What Famous People's Lives Reveal

By Kouloukis, George, Pan

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Book Id: WPLBN0100301725
Format Type: PDF (eBook)
File Size: 1.08 MB
Reproduction Date: 12/30/2018

Title: Success in Life : What Famous People's Lives Reveal  
Author: Kouloukis, George, Pan
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Non Fiction, Philosophy
Collections: Authors Community, Philosophy
Historic
Publication Date:
2018
Publisher: Self-published
Member Page: George Kouloukis

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Kouloukis, G. P. (2018). Success in Life : What Famous People's Lives Reveal. Retrieved from http://worldpubliclibrary.org/


Description
Famous people’s lives reveal that the good and bad seasons in their lives alternated from good to bad and vice versa according to a certain pattern. A good season has given its place to a bad one at a certain moment, and a bad season has given its place to a good one also at a certain moment – and so on. Great German composer Ludwig van Beethoven, for example, went through a bad period of his life around the age of 32 because he had become totally deaf. Contemplating suicide, he wrote his will. But later, at a certain point indicated in this book, he overcame his hearing problem, was recognized as one of the greatest composers of all time –he wrote nine insuperable symphonies– and became a celebrated member of Viennese society. Napoleon provides another such an example. During the years 1792 to 1809, he conquered almost all of Europe, was crowned Emperor of France, and lived a life full of grandeur, triumph, and success. But then things reversed, at an also certain point indicated in this book: Napoleon lost all he had achieved, he was defeated at the Battle of Waterloo, and he was exiled ultimately to the remote island of St. Helena. Those two examples are not the only ones. Lots of more others show the same alternations in the famous people’s lives, as revealed in this book. More important is however, that not only the famous people’s seasons alternate according to a certain pattern, but also the ordinary people’s lives alternate according to the same certain pattern, as you will see in detail in this book. The existence of that pattern helps, of course, all of us to know how our own good and bad seasons alternate in our life. Knowing that, however, helps us to live a much better life. The moment you’ve finished reading this book, you’ll be able to learn whether the years just ahead are good or bad for you, and how long this season will last. You’ll be able thus to act accordingly: if there is a storm on the horizon, you’ll take shelter in time; if sunny days loom ahead, you’ll take advantage of it before the opportunity passes. In short, you’ll be able to take crucial decisions regarding your career, marriage, family, relationships, and all other life’s issues. You will see among other things, why you mustn’t be seized by despair and pessimism when you are in a bad season – fearing that this season will never end. Winston Churchill, for example, failed his exams in school again and again when he was in a bad season of his life, and at a moment of another of his bad seasons he said: “I am done, I am finished.” But later he became prime minister of his country. You will also see why you can dare when you are in a good season – fate is with you. Christopher Columbus, for example, succeeded in discovering the New World since he was in a good season of his life, despite of the fact that almost everybody – the Spanish royal council included – was skeptical and had rejected his idea. There are many other benefits deriving from the certain pattern the seasons alternate in our lives, as you will see in detail in the book. We start revealing that pattern by seeing how the good and bad season alternated in the life of great German composer Ludwig van Beethoven.

Summary
Famous people’s lives reveal that the good and bad seasons in their lives alternated from good to bad and vice versa according to a certain pattern. More important is however, that not only the famous people’s, but also the ordinary people’s lives alternate according to the same certain pattern. That means we can know how our own seasons alternate in our life, so that we can take advantage of it.

Excerpt
Chapter 23. The Astonishing Discovery From the alternations of the good and bad seasons in the lives of the famous people we’ve seen in this book, very important observations are extracted. We start with Beethoven’s alternations of good and bad seasons. As we’ve seen in Chapter 1, his good and bad seasons alternated in 1776, 1792, 1809 and 1825. Between one of these dates there are 16-17 years. This alternation every 16-17 years happens however, in the lives of all people we’ve seen in this book. Great Italian composer Verdi’s for example, good and bad seasons in his life, alternated in 1842, 1859, 1875 and 1892 (as we’ve seen in Chapter 2). Again, between one of these dates there are constantly 16-17 years. Also famous Spanish painter Pablo Picasso’s good and bad seasons alternated in 1892, 1908, 1925, 1941, 1957, as we’ve seen, and also between each one of these dates there are constantly 16-17 years. The same happens with the seasons of all other people we’ve seen in this book, as you can recall. Between their dates of seasonal alternations there is a constant distance of 16-17 years. This observation consists the first base of our discovery. We proceed with our second observation. Alternations According to a Certain Pattern From the alternations of seasons in the lives of the famous people that we’ve seen in this book also derived that their alternations did not happen irregularly and at random, but according to a certain pattern. As we’ve seen in Chapters 1 and 2, Beethoven’s seasons alternated in 1776, 1792, 1809, 1825, while Verdi’s seasons alternated in 1842, 1859, 1875, and 1892. Connecting the dates of these two men we see that their seasons alternated at a continuous row of dates, this: 1776, 1792, 1809, 1825, 1842, 1859, 1875, and 1892 – every 16-17 years. Connecting now Beethoven, Verdi, Picasso, Gorbachev, the Dalai Lama, Thatcher, Taylor, and Jackie Kennedy’s dates of seasonal alternations, we see that their seasons also alternated at a continuous row of dates, this: 1776, 1792, 1809, 1825, 1842, 1859, 1875, 1892, 1908, 1925, 1941, 1957, 1974, and 1990 – every 16-17 years. That is a period of about 220 years (1776-1990). The same continuous row of dates is also observed in the lives of Napoleon, Victor Hugo, August Rodin, Winston Churchill, Aristotle Onassis, Nelson Mandela, Maria Callas, Sarah Bernhardt, Napoleon’s wife Josephine, Jimmy Carter, and John Glenn. If we put in a row the dates of their seasonal alternations we find that they also alternated in the same as above continuous row of dates: 1776, 1792, 1809, 1825, 1842, 1859, 1875, 1892, 1908, 1925, 1941, 1957, 1974, and 1990 – every 16-17 years. That is also a period of about 220 years (1776-1990). The conclusion is therefore, that the alternations of seasons in the lives of all people we’ve seen in this book did not happen irregularly or at random but according to a certain pattern in a continuous row of certain dates – covering a period of about 220 years – specifically this: 1776, 1792, 1809, 1825, 1842, 1859, 1875, 1892, 1908, 1925, 1941, 1957, 1974, and 1990 – every 16-17 years. The above observation consists the second base of our discovery. We continue with our next observation. A Period of More than 500 Years Our next observation is this: the alternations of seasons we’ve seen in this book start more than 500 years ago. As you’ve seen at the end of Chapter 9, in the life of Christopher Columbus, who lived more than 500 years ago, the seasons of his life alternated in 1479, 1496. If we extend these dates every 16-17 years, we arrive at the year 1990 – this way: 1496, 1512, 1529, 1545, 1562, 1578, 1595, 1611, 1628, 1644, 1661, 1677, 1694, 1710, 1727, 1744, 1760, 1776, 1792, 1809, 1825, 1842, 1859, 1875, 1892, 1908, 1925, 1941, 1957, 1974, 1990. This is a period of more than 500 years. The same observation also comes from the life of King Henry VIII of England, who also lived more than 500 years ago. His life shows that his seasons alternated in 1496, 1512, 1529, and 1545. If we again extend these dates every 16-17 years, we also arrive at the year 1990 – exactly as above again. Also from Queen Elizabeth’s I of England life – who lived more than 450 years ago – the same phenomenon is observed. Her life’s good and bad seasons alternated in 1545, 1562, 1578, and 1595. If we again extend these dates every 16-17 years, we also arrive at the year 1990 – exactly as above again. The conclusion is therefore, that the alternations of seasons we’ve seen in this book start more than 500 years ago. Two Courses of Seasons We continue with our next observation. As you’ve seen, Napoleon’s alternations of seasons happened at the same dates as those of Beethoven (1776, 1792 and 1809). But their seasons are opposite: while in 1776 a good season started for Beethoven, on the contrary a bad season started for Napoleon the same year. Similarly, while in the next date 1792 a bad season started for Beethoven, on the contrary a good season started for Napoleon the same year. Also, in the next date 1809 a good season started for Beethoven while a bad season started for Napoleon the same year. That phenomenon is observed in the lives of all people figured in this book. The seasons of Beethoven, Verdi, Picasso, Gorbachev, the Dalai Lama, Thatcher, Taylor, Kennedy Onassis, Columbus and Queen Elizabeth I are opposite to the seasons of Napoleon, Hugo, Rodin, Churchill, Onassis, Mandela, Josephine, Bernhardt, Carter, Glenn, Callas and King Henry VIII. The conclusion that derives therefore is that there are two opposite courses of seasons in the lives of people we’ve seen. The seasons of people belonging to the one course are opposite to those of the people belonging to the other course. For convenience we have called the course that starts with Beethoven, the first course; we have called the other course that starts with Napoleon, the second course. The above reversal of seasons is analogous as you remember, to the climatic seasons on our earth. When there is winter in the Northern Hemisphere, there is summer in the Southern Hemisphere. And vice versa: when there is winter in Australia, South America, and South Africa, there is summer in Europe, North America, and Asia. Men and Women, Equally Our next observation is this: the conclusions we have arrived at are valid not only for men but also for women. The seasons in the lives of women alternated every 16-17 years at the same dates as these of the men. The seasons of the women Thatcher, Taylor, and Jackie Kennedy for example (who all belong to the first course of seasons, as you can recall), alternated at the dates 1941, 1957, 1974, and 1990, exactly as the seasons of the men the Dalai Lama and Gorbachev, who all also belong to the first course of seasons. The same similarity is also observed in the lives of women and men who belong to the second course of seasons. Josephine’s seasons alternated in the same dates as these of Napoleon (1776, 1792, 1809), Sarah Bernhardt’s seasons alternated in the same dates as these of August Rodin (1859, 1875, 1892, 1909), Maria Callas’ dates of her seasonal alternations (1941, 1957, 1974) are the same as these of Onassis, Mandela, Carter and Glenn. All the findings we have seen therefore are valid for both men and women. The Seasons of Ordinary People Most important however, is that the above findings are not valid only for famous people – they are also valid for ordinary persons. Indeed, there is not any indication or any reason to assume that the alternations of the seasons in the lives of the ordinary people must be different than those of the famous people. We all are human beings. I repeat therefore, the argument: there is not any indication or any reason to assume that the alternations of the seasons in the lives of the ordinary people must be different than those of the famous people. To reinforce however, that argument, I will site how from my own life – the life of an ordinary person – derives that the alternations of seasons of the ordinary people are not different than those of the famous people. I will report in detail how that derives. Like most of us, I had, too, observed in my life that a certain obvious alternation of my seasons from good to bad ones and vice versa had occurred. Later, I asked myself whether these alternations happened according to a certain pattern or irregularly, without any pattern. But since it appeared to me too difficult to find the answer to this question, I abandoned then every such idea. Suddenly, however, a book arrived at my hands (The Universe, published by Time-Life Books), which gave me the first impulse to continue trying to find whether our seasons alternate according to a certain pattern or irregularly. That book mentioned that the magnetic poles of the sun reverse themselves every 11 years: the North Pole becomes the South Pole and vice-versa every 11 years. And that reversal always occurs on certain dates: somewhere in 1957, in 1968, in 1979, and so on every 11 years. These solar alternations led me to a spontaneous thought: Do the alternations of the sun’s poles influence human behavior? Are the alternations of the good and bad seasons of life synchronized with the patterns of solar activity? To test this hypothesis, I reflected on my own life. But my hypothesis proved to be wrong: my life’s good and bad seasons hadn’t alternated the way the sun’s poles reverse –every 11 years. All I could come up with, however, was a turning point in 1957: a bad season had ended for me then and a good one had started. But 11 years later –in 1968– there was no reversal. On the contrary, my good season continued even better. I therefore realized that my idea was groundless and I abandoned it. Later, a new book caught my attention. It was its title that aroused my interest: The Seasons of a Man’s Life. Its author, Daniel J. Levinson, a professor of psychology at Yale University, carried out a study showing that everyone’s life has four seasons, each lasting 20-22 years. But he did not distinguish which of those seasons are good and which are bad. That book however, brought me back to the question of the alternations of the good and bad seasons in our lives. Do those alternations, I wondered, happen not on certain dates –say, with the movement of the sun– but at certain points in our lives, such as the intervals of 20-22 years suggested by Levinson? With that possibility in mind, I decided to look back over my life again. But the outcome was again negative: my life’s good and bad seasons hadn’t alternated every 20-22 years. The only finding was that my life had taken a second turn around 1974: my previous good season gave then way to a bad season. However, between those two “turns” (1957 and around 1974) there wasn’t a period of 20-22 years, as I expected to find, influenced by Levinson’s study. On the contrary, it was only a period of 16-17 years. I abandoned so the effort once more. Some years later, though, a new element appeared. A new turn had occurred in my life around 1990: the bad season I’d been previously experiencing had ended and a new good one had started. I observed thus that my life’s seasons have alternated around the years 1957, 1974 and 1990 – every 16-17 years. The above observation was, of course, a starting point. So, I decided to explore the subject further. I ought, I said, to examine what happens in the lives of other people. Have their lives alternated the same way as in my own life? To find out what was happening in the lives of others, I decided to examine some biographies. But since biographies on ordinary persons usually don’t exist, or they are very few, I realized that only biographies of famous people I could examine. That work took me many years of research. Finally, the outcome was unbelievable. The results derived from the biographies all confirmed that the alternations of good and bad seasons in my own life – the life of an ordinary person – always occurred exactly as in the lives of the famous people I have studied: at the certain dates 1957, 1974 and 1990 – every 16-17 years. The conclusion that derives, therefore, is that the alternations of good and bad seasons at certain dates are valid not only for the famous people but also for the ordinary persons. A Universal Phenomenon Furthermore, from the biographies we’ve seen in this book we can observe that the phenomenon of the alternations of seasons is universal, happening all over the world and in all kinds of human races. Specifically: Napoleon, Beethoven, Columbus, Verdi, and others were born and brought up in Europe, while John Glenn, Jimmy Carter, Jackie Kennedy were born and brought up in the United States of America, and Gorbachev was born and brought up in Russia. Mandela was born and brought up in South Africa – that is, in the southern hemisphere of the earth– while the Dalai Lama was born and raised in Asia. Also, the Dalai Lama belongs to the Asian human race, while Mandela to the black one, and all the others belong to the white human race. This reveals, therefore, that the phenomenon of the alternations of seasons happens all over the world and in all kinds of human races. Foreseeing Our Seasons Based on our above discovery, it is obvious now that we can foresee how the good and bad seasons will alternate in the future in the life of every one of us. I explain in detail below how that happens. You will see whether the years just ahead are good or bad for you, and how long this season will last. Meanwhile, we’ll see in the next chapter which are our benefits from our ability to foreseeing our life’s good and bad season. They are a lot, and most are astonishing.

Table of Contents
Contents Introduction Chapter 1. Ludwig van Beethoven Chapter 2. Giuseppe Verdi Chapter 3. Pablo Picasso Chapter 4. Mikhail Gorbachev Chapter 5. The Dalai Lama of Tibet Chapter 6. Margaret Thatcher Chapter 7. Elizabeth Taylor Chapter 8. Jackie Kennedy Onassis Chapter 9. Christopher Columbus Chapter 10. Queen Elizabeth I of England Chapter 11. Napoleon I Chapter 12. Victor Hugo Chapter 13. August Rodin Chapter 14. Winston Churchill Chapter 15. Aristotle Onassis Chapter 16. Nelson Mandela Chapter 17. Maria Callas Chapter 18. Sarah Bernhardt Chapter 19. Josephine, Napoleon’s wife Chapter 20. King Henry VIII of England Chapter 21. Jimmy Carter Chapter 22. John Glenn Chapter 23. The Astonishing Discovery Chapter 24. The Advantages Endnotes Bibliography

 

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