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United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization Collection (13,747 Books)


The United Nations Publications, Documents, and Reports host one of the most complete collections on international treaties, acts, and global assessment research reports ever assembled. The United Nations Library contains Four distinct sub-collections: International Aid and Funding Collection, International Disarmament Documents Collections, Food and Agricultural Organization Collection, and UN Documents and Publications Collection, containing UN News, UN Overview information, UN Conference information, and other UN information resources.

 
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Preparation of Cassava Leaf Products and Their Use as Animal Feeds

By: V. Ravindran

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: The high protein content and nutritive value of cassava leaves are well documented. Cassava leaf yields amounting to as much as 4.60 tonnes dry matter per hectare may be produced as a by-product at root harvest (Ravindran and Rajaguru, 1988). The current practice, in most instances, is to return this valuable feed resource to the soil as a green manure. It is the intent of the present paper to review the available literature on the use of cassava leaves in anima...

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Improving the Nutritional Value of Cassava Products Using Microbia...

By: M. George

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: The significant increase in demand for livestock products in recent years in developing countries has required an increase in animal feed supply. In this context the role of cassava as a cheap carbohydrate source capable of supplying adequate calories to livestock is very significant. However, due to its low protein, vitamin and mineral content and lack of the sulphur containing amino acids such as methionine, it is often considered as inferior to maize or wheat...

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Use of Cassava Products in Poultry Feeding

By: J.M. Khajarern

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: Shortage of cereals has recently been a serious issue in several regions of the world; in many of these the use of cereal products as livestock feeds is increasingly unjustified in economic terms. Nonruminants like poultry are markedly affected by such a trend. Therefore, there is a need to exploit cheaper energy sources, to replace expensive cereals for livestock production, to relieve the food-feed competition in the future.

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Use of Cassava Products in Pig Feeding

By: G.G. Gomez

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is widely grown in the tropical regions. It is estimated that most (65 percent) of the cassava crop is used for human consumption while the remainder is used for animal feed, starch, and industrial applications. Some European countries are using cassava pellets, imported mainly from Thailand, in animal feeds, particularly for swine. Although the commercial production of dried cassava chips and pellets in most tropical countries...

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Economics of Cassava Product Use in Animal Feeding

By: C. Correa

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: During the last 10 years, grain substitutes in animal feed rations have gained more importance for intensive animal production in the developing countries. In the EC and US corn, sorghum and soybean meal have traditionally been used to fatten poultry, pigs and cattle. However, government policy interventions have raised domestic prices of these crops, resulting in a search for cheaper feedstuff ingredients. Carbohydrate sources were found in (industrial) byprodu...

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Cultivation Harvesting and Storage of Sweet Potato Products

By: G. Paneque Ramirez

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: The sweet potato (Ipomoea batata L.) is one of the twelve principal plant species utilized as a human feed throughout the world. It can be cultivated in many different climatic conditions, and as a result large areas of sweet potato are cultivated in Asia, Africa, Europe, America and Oceania (Table 2). The various ways in which it can be used are shown in Table I.

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Feeding of Sweet Potato to Monogastrics

By: P.L. Dominguez

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: The starchy roots and tubers produced in many tropical areas constitute an important energy source for human and animal feeding. Traditionally sweet potatoes have been cultivated in the tropical countries of Latin America and the Caribbean almost exclusively for tuber production to be used for human consumption, while its foliage has always been considered as a residue. The productive potential of certain varieties of sweet potato can reach from 24 to 36 ... cro...

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Feeding Systems for Tropical Rabbit Production Emphasizing Roots, ...

By: P.R. Cheeke

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: Rabbits have potential as meat-producing animals in the tropics, particularly on subsistence-type small farms. Such characteristics as small body size (thus low daily feed requirements), short generation interval, high reproductive potential, rapid growth rate and the ability to utilize forages and fibrous agricultural by-products are attributes in favor of rabbit production (Cheeke, 1986). In spite of these apparent advantages, rabbit production has not yet ach...

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Availability of Banana and Plantain Products for Animal Feeding

By: G.M. Babatunde

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: Most of the developing countries have been battling against the problem of how to adequately feed their livestock and poultry because of inadequate production of conventional ingredients for livestock feeding. Many of these countries are also well blessed with considerable good fertile, arable land, good sunshine and abundant and well distributed rainfall. The inadequate quantities of concentrated feedstuffs they produce yearly are competed for by humans and the...

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Economic Aspects of Banana and Plantain Use in Animal Feeding the ...

By: R.T. Fomunyam

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: Cameroon produces about 2.3 million tons (Table I) of plantains and bananas annually (World Bank 1984, Ministry of Agriculture, 1982-83, 1984). Approximately half of this is consumed domestically while less than two fifths is exported. The remaining quantities are either discarded as waste products or are allowed to rot in the fields during harvest. While the plantain and banana fruit is a valuable foodstuff for human consumption, the waste part of it can be fed...

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Introduction

By: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Nutrition Reference Publication

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List of Participants

By: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Nutrition Reference Publication

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Trees as Browse and to Support Animal Production

By: M. Baumer

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: Ligneous plants, which may be trees, small trees, shrubs or undershrubs, are an important component of the fodder resources for livestock and wildlife. The fodder value of their leaves and fruits is often superior to herbaceous plants, particularly in the case oflegumes. In arid and semiarid zones, they provide the largest part of the protein supply during the driest months; for example, it is estimated that, in the Sahel, up to 80% of the protein ration is prov...

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Fodder Trees and Fodder Shrubs in Range and Farming Systems of the...

By: C.P. Chen

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: The Asia and Pacific region encompasses a wide range of climatic conditions and a diversity of socio-cultural entities. This diversity has given rise to various farming systems, each of which aims at optimizing the utilization of the natural resources they are endowed with. The multitude of agro-c1imatic zones confers upon the region a vast assemblage of tree and shrub species which could potentially benefit livestock production. Despite the variability in farmi...

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Fodder Trees and Shrubs in Range and Farming Systems in Dry Tropic...

By: M.S. Dicko

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: Dry tropical Africa refers to about 38% of the continent and is characterized by an average annual rainfall of less than 600 mm. About 45% of the area is desert while the remainder constitutes the arid and semiarid zones which are actually the portions capable of supporting plant, animal and human life. The regional distribution of this climatic zone is 9% in Central Africa. 34% in East Africa and 20% in Southern Africa (Le Houerou and Popov, 1981).

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Fodder Trees and Shrubs in Range and Farming Systems in Tropical H...

By: O.B. Smith

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: In many developing countries, sustained and high population growth rates, combined with limited and rapidly diminishing land for food and forage production, have created a need to intensify agricultural production in order to bridge the gap between requirement and supply of food and ensure proper human nutrition. Intensification, in the context of ruminant production systems, means a broadening of the feed resource base to compensate not only for the shrinking o...

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Fodder Trees and Shrubs in Range and Farming Systems in North Africa

By: A. Ei Aich

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: The shrublands of North Africa cover about 940,000 krn?, of which 65,000, 350,000 and 525,000 km? are located in semiarid, arid and desert regions, respectively (Le Houerou, 1989a). They provide both a valuable grazing resource, because of their nutritive value and palatability, and prevent soil erosion by increasing soil stability. According to Le Houerou (1989a), grazing represents 60 to 80% of the economic output of North African shrublands. Used as fodder, t...

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Practical Technologies to Optimise Feed Utilisation by Ruminants

By: R.A. Leng

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: Rates of growth and milk production from ruminants in developing countries are generally low and often only 10% of the genetic potential of the animal. The reasons for low productivity are complex but in order of priority they appear to be: - The imbalanced nature of the nutrients that arise from digestion of the available forage resources when these are fed without supplements - The incidence of disease and parasitism - The often harsh climatic conditions The u...

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Nutritional Potential of Fodder Trees and Shrubs as Protein Source...

By: C. Devendra

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: Fodder trees and shrubs represent an enormous potential source of protein for ruminants in the tropics. Until relatively recently, these feed resources have been generally ignored in feeding systems for ruminants, mainly because of inadequate knowledge on various aspects of their potential use, as well as initiatives associated with the development of more innovative systems of feeding.

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Nutritional Potentialities of Fodder Trees and Fodder Shrubs as Pr...

By: J.P.F. D?Melio

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: Over the past two or three decades, there has been a significant upsurge of interest in the use of fodder trees and shrubs as sources of protein and other nutrients for non-ruminant animals. Although considerable attention has been given to the use of leaf meals derived from these trees and shrubs, there is a growing realisation that the seeds of these species may serve as protein sources in their own right and limited work has been published in this area.

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