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Physics Literature (295 Books)


The World Public Library Physics Collection contains 263 conversations regarding the nature of physics.

 
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A Course in Fluid Mechanics with Vector Field Theory

By: Dennis C. Prieve

Physics Literature

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A Guided Tour of Mathematical Physics

By: Roel Snieder

Physics Literature

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A History of Science

By: Henry Smith Williams

Physics Literature

Excerpt: Book I. Should the story that is about to be unfolded be found to lack interest, the writers must stand convicted of unpardonable lack of art. Nothing but dullness in the telling could mar the story, for in itself it is the record of the growth of those ideas that have made our race and its civilization what they are; of ideas instinct with human interest, vital with meaning for our race; fundamental in their influence on human development; part and parcel of th...

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A History of Science

By: Henry Smith Williams

Physics Literature

Excerpt: Book II. The Beginnings ff Modern Science: The studies of the present book cover the progress of science from the close of the Roman period in the fifth century A.D. to about the middle of the eighteenth century. In tracing the course of events through so long a period, a difficulty becomes prominent which everywhere besets the historian in less degree-a difficulty due to the conflict between the strictly chronological and the topical method of treatment. We mus...

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A History of Science

By: Henry Smith Williams

Physics Literature

Excerpt: Chapter I. The Successors of Newton in Astronomy. The work of Johannes Hevelius-Halley and Hevelius-Halley's observation of the transit of Mercury, and his method of determining the parallax of the planets-Halley's observation of meteors-His inability to explain these bodies-The important work of James Bradley-Lacaille's measurement of the arc of the meridian-The determination of the question as to the exact shape of the earth-D'Alembert and his influence upon s...

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A History of Science

By: Henry Smith Williams

Physics Literature

Excerpt: Book IV. Modern Development of the Chemical and Biological Sciences. AS regards chronology, the epoch covered in the present volume is identical with that viewed in the preceding one. But now as regards subject matter we pass on to those diverse phases of the physical world which are the field of the chemist, and to those yet more intricate processes which have to do with living organisms. So radical are the changes here that we seem to be entering new worlds; a...

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Amateur Physics for the Amateur Pool Player

By: Ron Shepard

Physics Literature

Introduction: The word amateur is based on the Latin words amator (a lover) and amare (to love). An amateur is someone who loves what he does, and pursues it for the pleasure of the act itself. These notes are intended for the pool player who enjoys playing the game, and who enjoys understanding how things work using the language of physics. There is probably very little pool playing technique discussed in this manuscript that will be new to the experienced pool player, ...

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An Introduction to the Interacting Boson Model of the Atomic Nucleus

By: Walter Pfeifer

Physics Literature

Preface: The interacting boson model (IBM)is suitable for describing intermediate and heavy atomic nuclei.

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Process Physics: Modeling Reality as Self-Organizing Information

By: Reginald T. Cahill

Physics Literature

Excerpt: Modeling Reality. The present day modeling of reality and the mindset of physicists was very much set by the Ancient Greeks some 2,500 years ago, particularly by Democritus with his concept of atoms as objects occupying a position in space. Ever since physicists have believed in objects and their a priori rules of behavior or ?laws of physics? as fundamental to modeling reality. This mode of modeling has been extremely successful. These concepts were clearly abs...

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Process Physics: Inertia Gravity and the Quantum

By: Reginald T. Cahill

Physics Literature

Abstract: Process Physics models reality as self-organizing relational or semantic information using a self-referentially limited neural network model. This generalizes the traditional non-process syntactical modeling of reality by taking account of the limitations and characteristics of self-referential syntactical information systems, discovered by Godel and Chaitin, and the analogies with the standard quantum formalism and its limitations. In process physics space and...

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Smart Nanostructures and Synthetic Quantum Systems

By: Reginald T. Cahill

Physics Literature

Abstract: So far proposed quantum computers use fragile and environmentally sensitive natural quantum systems. Here we explore the notion that synthetic quantum systems suitable for quantum computation may be fabricated from smart nanostructures using topological excitations of a neural-type network that can mimic natural quantum systems. These developments are a technological application of process physics which is a semantic information theory of reality in which space...

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Process Physics: From Quantum Foam to General Relativity

By: Reginald T. Cahill

Physics Literature

Abstract: Progress in the new information-theoretic process physics is reported in which the link to the phenomenology of general relativity is made. In process physics the fundamental assumption is that reality is to be modeled as self-organizing semantic (or internal or relational) information using a self-referentially limited neural network model. Previous progress in process physics included the demonstration that space and quantum physics are emergent and unified, ...

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Pregeometric Modeling of the Space Time Phenomenology

By: Reginald T. Cahill

Physics Literature

Excerpt: Introduction At present we have no theory of the phenomena of time and space. Rather we have a very successful phenomenology given to us by Einstein. We regard Einstein's model as a phenomenology for the simple reason that in setting up this model one makes very explicit assumptions about time and space. For example one of the key Einstein assumptions was to assume, in addition to the very phenomenon of time, that time is local, which contrasted sharply with New...

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Self-Referential Noise and the Synthesis of Three-Dimensional Space

By: Reginald T. Cahill

Physics Literature

Introduction: General relativity begins the modeling of reality by assuming differentiable manifolds and dynamical equations for a 3:1 metric spacetime. Clearly this amounts to a high level phenomenology which must be accompanied by various meta-rules for interpretation and application. The same situation also occurs in the quantum theory. But how are we to arrive at an understanding of the origin and logical necessity for the form of these laws and their interpretationa...

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Self-Referential Noise as a Fundamental Aspect of Reality

By: Reginald T. Cahill

Physics Literature

Abstract: Noise is often used in the study of open systems, such as in classical Brownian motion and in Quantum Dynamics, to model the influence of the environment. However generalizing results from Godel and Chaitin in mathematics suggests that systems that are sufficiently rich that self-referencing is possible contain intrinsic randomness. We argue that this is relevant to modeling the universe, even though it is by definition a closed system. We show how a three-dime...

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Black Holes in Elliptical and Spiral Galaxies and in Globular Clusters

By: Reginald T. Cahill

Physics Literature

Excerpt: Super massive black holes have been discovered at the centers of galaxies, and also in globular clusters. The data shows correlations between the black hole mass and the elliptical galaxy mass or globular cluster mass. It is shown that this correlation is accurately predicted by a theory of gravity which includes the new dynamics of self interacting space. In spiral galaxies this dynamics is shown to explain the so-called ?dark matter ? rotation-curve anomaly, a...

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Bootstrap Universe from Self-Referential Noise

By: Reginald T. Cahill

Physics Literature

Excerpt: We further deconstruct Heraclitean Quantum Systems giving a model for a universe using pregeometric notions in which the end-game problem is overcome by means of self-referential noise. The model displays self-organization with the emergence of 3-space and time. The time phenomenon is richer than the present geometric modeling.

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3-Space In-Flow Theory of Gravity : Boreholes Black Holes and the ...

By: Reginald T. Cahill

Physics Literature

Excerpt: A theory of 3-space explains the phenomenon of gravity as arising from the time dependence and inhomogeneity of the differential flow of this 3-space. The emergent theory of gravity has two gravitational constants: GN - Newton?s constant, and a dimensionless constant à. Various experiments and astronomical observations have shown that à is the fine structure constant ÷1/137. Here we analyze the Greenland Ice Shelf and Nevada Test Site borehole g anomalies, and c...

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Dynamical Fractal 3-Space and the Generalized Schrdinger Equation ...

By: Reginald T. Cahill

Physics Literature

Excerpt: The new dynamical ?quantum foam? theory of 3-space is described at the classical level by a velocity field. This has been repeatedly detected and for which the dynamical equations are now established. These equations predict 3-space ?gravitational wave ? effects, and these have been observed, and the 1991 DeWitte data is analyzed to reveal the fractal structure of these ?gravitational waves ?. This velocity field describes the differential motion of 3-space, and...

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Novel Gravity Probe B Frame-Dragging Effect

By: Reginald T. Cahill

Physics Literature

Excerpt: The Gravity Probe B (GP-B) satellite experiment will measure the precession of on-board gyroscopes to extraordinary accuracy. Such precessions are predicted by General Relativity (GR), and one component of this precession is the ?frame-dragging? or Lense-Thirring effect, which is caused by the rotation of the Earth. A new theory of gravity, which passes the same extant tests of GR, predicts, however, a second and much larger ?frame-dragging? precession. The magn...

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