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Penn State University's Electronic Classics Series Collection (1,084 Books)


PSU's Electronic Classics Series, Great Literary Works in PDF Penn State's Electronic Classics: The PSU's Electronic Classics Series Site was created and is maintained by Jim Manis. These files include original work published in hard copy by the Pennsylvania State University and classical works of literature in English.

 
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Five Works of : Areopagitica, Comus, Lalegro, Il Penseroso, And Ly...

By: John Milton

Excerpt: They, who to states and governors of the Commonwealth direct their speech, High Court of Parliament, or, wanting such access in a private condition, write that which they foresee may advance the public good; I suppose them, as at the beginning of no mean endeavour, not a little altered and moved inwardly in their minds: some with doubt of what will be the success, others with fear of what will be the censure; some with hope, others with confidence of what they have to speak.

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The Argonautica

By: Apollonius Rhodius

Introduction: Much has been written about the chronology of Alexandrian literature and the famous Library, founded by Ptolemy Soter, but the dates of the chief writers are still matters of conjecture. The birth of Apollonius Rhodius is placed by scholars at various times between 296 and 260 B.C., while the year of his death is equally uncertain. In fact, we have very little information on the subject.

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Aria Da Capo a Play in One Act 1920

By: Edna St. Vincent Millay

Excerpt: [The curtain rises on a stage set for a Harlequinade, a merry black and white interior. Directly behind the footlights, and running parallel with them, is a long table, covered with a gay black and white cloth, on which is spread a banquet. At the opposite ends of this table, seated on delicate thin-legged chairs with high backs, are Pierrot and Columbine, dressed according to the tradition, excepting that Pierrot is in lilac, and Columbine in pink. They are dining.]

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Arms and the Man

By: George Bernard Shaw

Introduction: To the irreverent--and which of us will claim entire exemption from that comfortable classification?-- there is something very amusing in the attitude of the orthodox criticism toward Bernard Shaw. He so obviously disregards all the canons and unities and other things which every well-bred dramatist is bound to respect that his work is really unworthy of serious criticism (orthodox). Indeed he knows no more about the dramatic art than, according to his own ...

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The Arrow of Gold : A Story between Two Notes

By: Joseph Conrad

Excerpt: The pages which follow have been extracted from a pile of manuscript which was apparently meant for the eye of one woman only. She seems to have been the writer?s childhood?s friend. They had parted as children, or very little more than children. Years passed. Then something recalled to the woman the companion of her young days and she wrote to him: ?I have been hearing of you lately. I know where life has brought you. You certainly selected your own road. But t...

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The Art of Writing

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

Excerpt: There is nothing more disenchanting to man than to be shown the springs and mechanism of any art. All our arts and occupations lie wholly on the surface; it is on the surface that we perceive their beauty, fitness, and significance; and to pry below is to be appalled by their emptiness and shocked by the coarseness of the strings and pulleys.

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Le Morte Darthur

By: Thomas Malory

Excerpt: Bibliographical Note. The Morte Darthur was finished, as the epilogue tells us, in the ninth year of Edward IV., i.e. between March 4, 1469 and the same date in 1470. It is thus, fitly enough, the last important English book written before the introduction of printing into this country, and since no manuscript of it has come down to us it is also the first English classic for our knowledge of which we are entirely dependent on a printed text. Caxton?s story of h...

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Le Morte Darthur

By: Thomas Malory

Excerpt: How Sir Tristram jousted, and smote down King Arthur, because he told him not the cause why he bare that shield. And if so be ye can descrive what ye bear, ye are worthy to bear the arms. As for that, said Sir Tristram, I will answer you; this shield was given me, not desired, of Queen Morgan le Fay; and as for me, I can not descrive these arms, for it is no point of my charge, and yet I trust to God to bear them with worship. Truly, said King Arthur, ye ought n...

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Le Morte Darthur

By: Thomas Malory

Excerpt: How Sir Launcelot rode on his adventure, and how he holp a dolorous lady from her pain, and how that he fought with a dragon. Now leave we Sir Tristram de Liones, and speak we of Sir Launcelot du Lake, and of Sir Galahad, Sir Launcelot?s son, how he was gotten, and in what manner, as the book of French rehearseth. Afore the time that Sir Galahad was gotten or born, there came in an hermit unto King Arthur upon Whitsunday, as the knights sat at the Table Round. A...

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Le Morte Darthur

By: Thomas Malory

Excerpt: How Sir Launcelot in his madness took a sword and fought with a knight, and leapt in a bed. And now leave we of a while of Sir Ector and of Sir Percivale, and speak we of Sir Launcelot that suf fered and endured many sharp showers, that ever ran wild wood from place to place, and lived by fruit and such as he might get, and drank water two year; and other clothing had he but little but his shirt and his breech.

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Le Morte Darthur

By: Thomas Malory

Excerpt: How at the vigil of the Feast of Pentecost entered into the hall before King Arthur a damosel, and desired Sir Launcelot for to come and dub a knight, and how he went with her. At the vigil of Pentecost, when all the fellowship of the Round Table were come unto Camelot and there heard their service, and the tables were set ready to the meat, right so entered into the hall a full fair gentlewoman on horseback, that had ridden full fast, for her horse was all besweated.

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Le Morte Darthur

By: Thomas Malory

Excerpt: How Sir Percivale came to a recluse and asked counsel, and how she told him that she was his aunt. Now saith the tale, that when Sir Launcelot was rid den after Sir Galahad, the which had all these ad ventures above said, Sir Percivale turned again unto the recluse, where he deemed to have tidings of that knight that Launcelot followed. And so he kneeled at her window, and the recluse opened it and asked Sir Percivale what he would. Madam, he said, I am a knight...

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Le Morte Darthur

By: Thomas Malory

Excerpt: How Sir Launcelot came to a chapel, where he found dead, in a white shirt, a man of religion, of an hundred winter old. When the hermit had kept Sir Launcelot three days, the hermit gat him an horse, an helm, and a sword. And then he departed about the hour of noon. And then he saw a little house. And when he came near he saw a chapel, and there beside he saw an old man that was clothed all in white full richly; and then Sir Launcelot said: God save you. God kee...

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Le Morte Darthur

By: Thomas Malory

Excerpt: How Sir Gawaine was nigh weary of the quest of the Sangreal, and of his marvellous dream. When Sir Gawaine was departed from his fellow ship he rode long without any adventure. For he found not the tenth part of adventure as he was wont to do. For Sir Gawaine rode from Whitsuntide until Michaelmas and found none adventure that pleased him. So on a day it befell Gawaine met with Sir Ector de Maris, and either made great joy of other that it were marvel to tell.

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Le Morte Darthur

By: Thomas Malory

Excerpt: How Sir Galahad fought at a tournament, and how he was known of Sir Gawaine and Sir Ector de Maris. Now saith this story, when Galahad had rescued Percivale from the twenty knights, he yede tho into a waste forest wherein he rode many journeys; and he found many adventures the which he brought to an end, whereof the story maketh here no mention. Then he took his way to the sea on a day, and it befell as he passed by a castle where was a wonder tournament, but th...

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Le Morte Darthur

By: Thomas Malory

Excerpt: Chapter 1. Of the joy King Arthur and the queen had of the achievement of the Sangreal; and how Launcelot fell to his old love again. So after the quest of the Sangreal was fulfilled, and all knights that were left alive were come again unto the Table Round, as the book of the Sangreal maketh mention, then was there great joy in the court; and in especial King Arthur and Queen Guenever made great joy of the remnant that were come home, and passing glad was the k...

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Le Morte Darthur

By: Thomas Malory

Excerpt: Chapter 1. How Queen Guenever rode a-Maying with certain knights of the Round Table and clad all in green. So it befell in the month of May, Queen Guenever called unto her knights of the Table Round; and she gave them warning that early upon the morrow she would ride a-Maying into woods and fields beside Westminster. And I warn you that there be none of you but that he be well horsed, and that ye all be clothed in green, outher in silk outher in cloth; and I sha...

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Le Morte Darthur

By: Thomas Malory

Excerpt: Chapter 1. Of a damosel which came girt with a sword for to find a man of such virtue to draw it out of the scabbard. After the death of Uther Pendragon reigned Arthur his son, the which had great war in his days for to get all England into his hand. For there were many kings within the realm of England, and in Wales, Scotland, and Cornwall. So it befell on a time when King Arthur was at London, there came a knight and told the king tidings how that the King Rie...

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Le Morte Darthur

By: Thomas Malory

Excerpt: Chapter 1. How Sir Agravaine and Sir Mordred were busy upon Sir Gawaine for to disclose the love between Sir Launcelot and Queen Guenever In May when every lusty heart flourisheth and bourgeoneth, for as the season is lusty to behold and comfortable, so man and woman rejoice and gladden of summer coming with his fresh flowers: for winter with his rough winds and blasts cause a lusty man and woman to cower and sit fast by the fire. So in this season, as in the mo...

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Le Morte Darthur

By: Thomas Malory

Excerpt: Chapter 1. How Sir Mordred presumed and took on him to be King of England, and would have married the queen, his father?s wife As Sir Mordred was ruler of all England, he did do make letters as though that they came from beyond the sea, and the letters specified that King Arthur was slain in battle with Sir Launcelot. Wherefore Sir Mordred made a parliament, and called the lords together, and there he made them to choose him king; and so was he crowned at Canter...

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