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NASA Publication Collection (15,040 Books)


National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA Publication Collection is an archive of the most fascinating information one has ever discovered. The World Public Library NASA Collection contains reports, summaries, new releases, and publications about NASA's Solar System Missions, Deep Space Missions, Earth Observing Missions, Humans in Space, and Earth Observing Stations.

 
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Educational Brief : Space Shuttle Glider: by National Aeronautics ...

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Excerpt: Your Space Shuttle Glider is a scale model of the U.S. Space Shuttle orbiter. The airplane-like orbiter usually remains in Earth orbit for up to two weeks at a time. It normally carries a six- to seven-person crew, which includes the mission commander, pilot, and several mission and/or payload specialists who have specialized training associated with the payloads and experiments being flown on that mission...

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The Brain in Space: A Teachers Guide with Activities for Neuroscie...

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Urban and Rural Community Enrichment Program Established in 1981: ...

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Excerpt: The NASA Urban and Rural Community Enrichment Program (URCEP) is a NASA Aerospace Education Services Program designed specifically to serve grades 5?8 in the education community of underrepresented and underserved populations in urban and rural sites. This customized program is planned, coordinated, and implemented in participating schools by the URCEP team, along with school representatives. Using motivating demonstrations and scale models of aeronautical and s...

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Computing Environments and Technology Branch: by National Aeronaut...

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Description: This document contains information regarding topics such as Highly Adaptable Applications/Services, AETD Action Item System, and AETD Dashboard metrics...

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Report of the Presidents Commission on Implementation of United St...

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Executive Summary: On January 14, 2004, President George W. Bush announced a new vision for America?s civil space program that calls for human and robotic missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. This vision set forth goals of: returning the Space Shuttle safely to flight; completing the International Space Station (ISS); phasing out the Space Shuttle when the ISS is complete (about 2010); sending a robotic orbiter and Lander to the Moon; sending a human expedition to the...

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Space Shuttle Accident Hearings before the Subcommittee on Science...

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Excerpt: OPENING STATEMENT BY SENATOR GORTON. This hearing of the Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space will come to order. We are here, as all of you know, to begin the inquiry of the Congress, and most specifically, of the Senate into the tragic events of January 28, 1986, and to help give us the necessary insight into what actions the Congress should take as a response to that tragedy, and what changes, if any, are necessary in our own space programs in the future...

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Nasa Systems Engineering Handbook: by Edward J. Hoffman, Dr.

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Excerpt: NASA Systems Engineering Handbook Page 2, Foreword: In an attempt to demonstrate the potential dangers of relying on purely ''cookbook logical thinking, the mathematician/philosopher Carl Hempel posed a paradox. If we want to prove the hypothesis ?All ravens are black, we can look for many ravens and determine if they all meet our criteria. Hempel suggested changing the hypothesis to its logical contra-positive (a rewording with identical meaning) would be easie...

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Asteroids: by Natio...

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Excerpt: ASTEROIDS are rocky fragments left over from the formation of the solar system about 4.6 billion years ago. Most of these fragments of ancient space rubble sometimes referred to by scientists as minor planets can be found orbiting the Sun in a belt between Mars and Jupiter. This region in our solar system, called the Asteroid Belt or Main Belt, probably contains millions of asteroids ranging widely in size from Ceres, which at 940 km in diameter is about one-qua...

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Comets: by National...

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Excerpt: Throughout history, people have been both awed and alarmed by COMETS, stars with ?long hair? that appeared in the sky unannounced and unpredictably. We now know that comets are dirty-ice leftovers from the formation of our solar system around 4.6 billion years ago. They are among the least-changed objects in our solar system and, as such, may yield important clues about the formation of our solar system. We can predict the orbits of many of them, but not all...

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Earth: by National ...

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Excerpt: EARTH, our home planet, is the only planet in our solar system known to harbor life life that is incredibly diverse. All of the things we need to survive are provided under a thin layer of atmosphere that separates us from the uninhabitable void of space. Earth is made up of complex, interactive systems that are often unpredictable. Air, water, land, and life including humans combine forces to create a constantly changing world that we are striving to understand...

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Jupiter: by Nationa...

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Excerpt: With its numerous moons and several rings, the JUPITER system is a ?mini-solar system.? Jupiter is the most massive planet in our solar system, and in composition it resembles a small star. In fact, if Jupiter had been between fifty and one hundred times more massive, it would have become a star rather than a planet. On January 7, 1610, while sky gazing from his garden in Padua, Italy, astronomer Galileo Galilei was surprised to see four small ?stars? near Jupit...

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Mars: by National A...

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Excerpt: The red planet MARS has inspired wild flights of imagination over the centuries, as well as intense scientific interest. Whether fancied to be the source of hostile invaders of Earth, the home of a dying civilization, or a rough-and-tumble mining colony of the future, Mars provides fertile ground for science fiction writers, based on seeds planted by centuries of scientific observations. We know that Mars is a small rocky body once thought to be very Earth-like....

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Mercury: by Nationa...

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Excerpt: The small and rocky planet MERCURY is the closest planet to the Sun; it speeds around the Sun in a wildly elliptical (non-circular) orbit that takes it as close as 47 million km and as far as 70 million km from the Sun. Mercury completes a trip around the Sun every 88 days, speeding through space at nearly 50 km per second, faster than any other planet. Because it is so close to the Sun, temperatures on its surface can reach a scorching 467 degrees Celsius. But ...

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Moon: by National A...

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Excerpt: The regular daily and monthly rhythms of Earth?s only natural satellite, the MOON, have guided timekeepers since ancient times. Its influence on Earth?s cycles, notably tides, has also been charted by many cultures in many ages. More than 70 spacecraft have been sent to the Moon; 12 astronauts have walked upon its surface and brought back 382 kg of lunar rock and soil to Earth. The presence of the Moon stabilizes Earth?s wobble. This has led to a much more stabl...

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Moons of Jupiter: b...

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Excerpt: The planet Jupiter?s four largest moons are called the Galilean satellites, after Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei who observed them in 1610. The moons were also observed then by German astronomer Simon Marius. These moons, named IO, EUROPA, GANYMEDE, and CALLISTO, are particularly intriguing since each has its own amazing distinction in our solar system. Io is the most volcanically active body in the solar system, and parts of its surface change within weeks....

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Neptune: by Nationa...

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Excerpt: The eighth planet from the Sun, NEPTUNE was the first planet located through mathematical predictions rather than through regular observations of the sky. When Uranus didn?t travel exactly as astronomers expected it to, two mathematicians, working independently of each other, proposed the position and mass of another, as yet unknown planet that could account for Uranus? orbit. Although ?the establishment? ignored the predictions, a young astronomer decided to lo...

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Pluto and Charon: b...

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Excerpt: Long considered to be the smallest, coldest, and most distant planet from the Sun, PLUTO may also be the largest of a group of objects that orbit in a disk-like zone of comets beyond the orbit of Neptune. Discovered by American astronomer Clyde Tombaugh in 1930, Pluto takes 248 years to orbit the Sun. Pluto?s most recent close approach to the Sun was in 1989. Between 1979 and 1999, Pluto was actually closer to the Sun than Neptune, providing rare opportunities t...

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Saturn: by National...

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Excerpt: SATURN is the most distant of the five planets known to ancient stargazers. In 1610, Italian Galileo Galilei was the first astronomer to gaze at Saturn through a telescope. To his surprise, he saw a pair of objects on either side of the planet, which he later drew as ?cup handles? attached to the planet on each side. In 1659, Dutch astronomer Christiaan Huygens announced that this was a ring encircling the planet. In 1675, Italian-born astronomer Jean Dominique ...

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Sun: by National Ae...

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Excerpt: Our SUN has inspired mythology in almost all cultures, including ancient Egyptians, Aztecs, Native Americans, and Chinese. We now know that the Sun is a huge, bright sphere of mostly ionized gas, about 4.5 billion years old, and is the closest star to Earth at a distance of about 150 million km. The next closest star Proxima Centauri is nearly 268,000 times farther away. There are millions of similar stars in the Milky Way Galaxy (and billions of galaxies in the...

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Our Solar System: b...

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Excerpt: From our small world we have gazed upon the cosmic ocean for thousands of years. Ancient astronomers observed points of light that appeared to move among the stars. They called these objects planets, meaning wanderers, and named them after Roman deities Jupiter, king of the gods; Mars, the god of war; Mercury, messenger of the gods; Venus, the goddess of love and beauty; and Saturn, father of Jupiter and god of agriculture. The stargazers also observed comets wi...

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