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Folklore (19 Books)


Works of folklore consists of legends, music, oral history, proverbs, jokes, popular beliefs, fairy tales, stories, tall tales, and customs that are the traditions of a culture, subculture, or group. It is also the set of practices through which those expressive genres are shared. The study of folklore is sometimes called folkloristics. In usage, there is a continuum between folklore and mythology.

 
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Ko Pele Hiki 'Ana Mai I Hawai'I

By: William H. Wilson

The internationally known ?Aha Punana Leo, Inc. is a non-profit organization which was established in 1983 to revitalize the nearly extinct Hawaiian language and establish schools taught entirely through that language. The following year, the organization founded the first Punana Leo school which was also the first Native American language immersion school in the United States. After the Punana Leo families changed an 1896 law banning Hawaiian language schools, the Punan...

He wahine malihini o Pele i holo kona manao e holo mai i Hawaii nei. Aole i maikai kona noho ana me kona kaikuaana, me Namakaokahai a ua makemake o ia e holo mai i kekahi aina okoa.

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O Haloa, Ka Hawaii Mua Loa

By: William H. Wilson

The internationally known Aha Punana Leo, Inc. is a non-profit organization which was established in 1983 to revitalize the nearly extinct Hawaiian language and establish schools taught entirely through that language. The following year, the organization founded the first Punana Leo school which was also the first Native American language immersion school in the United States. After the Punana Leo families changed an 1896 law banning Hawaiian language schools, the Punana...

O Wakea, o ia hoi ka makuakane o na mokupuni o Hawaii nei, o ia ke kane. O Hoohokukalani ka wahine. Hapai o Hoohokukalani a nui aela kona opu. O kana pepe mua ana keia, o ia hoi kana hiapo. Hanau o Hoohokukalani. He pepe eepa kana; he keiki alualu. Olelo ia o ia e kanu i ia pepe ma ka aoao hikina o ka hale, o ia hoi ma ka aoao e pii mai ai ka la i ke kakahiaka.

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Hawaiian Mythology

By: Martha Beckwith

Why after thirty years, should Beckwith’s Hawaiian Mythology be reprinted? Why, for the last twenty-five years, have scholars and amateurs alike sought for either new or used copies of this book which has become a rarity? To begin with, it was the first, and is still the only, scholarly work which charts a pathway through the hundreds of books and articles, many of them obscure and scarce, and through the little-known manuscripts that record the orally transmitted myths,...

This guide to the native mythology of Hawaii has grown out of a childhood and youth spent within sound of the hula drum at the foot of the domelike House of the Sun on the windy island of Maui. There, wandering along its rocky coast and sandy beaches, exploring its windward gorges, riding above the cliffs by moonlight when the surf was high or into the deep forests at midday, we were aware always of a life just out of reach of us latecomers but lived intensely by the kin...

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Fornander Collection of Hawaiian Antiquities and Folk-Lore. Vol. 4

By: Abraham Fornander

Ma keia mele i hakuia e Kahakuikamoana, ua maopopo ka mookuauhau o ka loaa ana o keia mau aina. A mehe mea la no loko mai o Tahiti ka hoomaka ana e loaa na kanaka ma keia mau mokupuni, aka, aole i maopopo ma keia mau lalani

According to this tradition Hawaii just rose up from the ocean, together with the group of islands of Tahiti, and it would seem the Tahitian Islands were the first group in this Pacific Ocean, and Hawaii was of a later appearance, as shown by the lines in the mele composed by Kahakuikamoana running thus: “Now cometh forth Hawaiinuiakea, Appeareth out of darkness.An island, a land is born, The row of islands from Nuumea;The group of islands at the borders of Tahiti.”

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Fornander Collection of Hawaiian Antiquities and Folk-Lore. Vol. 5

By: Abraham Fornander

In this second series of the Fornander Collection of Hawaiian Folk-lore, with the exception of a few transpositions, as mentioned in the preceding volume, the order of the author has been observed in the main by grouping together, first, the more important legends and traditions of the race, of universal acceptance through- out the whole group, followed by the briefer folk-tales of more local character. A few of similar names occur in the collection, indicating, in some...

Maihuna was the father and Malaiakalani was the mother of Kawelo, who was born in Hanamaulu,1 Kauai. There were five children in the family. The first was Kawelomahamahaia; the second was Kaweloleikoo. These two were males; after these two came Kaenakuokalani, a female; next to her was Kawelo leimakua and the last child was Kamalama. Kaweloleimakua, or Kawelo is the subject of this story.

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Fornander Collection of Hawaiian Antiquities and Folk-Lore. Vol. 6

By: Abraham Fornander

This third series of the Fornander Collection of Hawaiian Folklore, in its varied character, presents valuable features for antiquarian and ethnic students of Polynesia in general and Hawaii in particular. The papers included in Part I, mostly the result of S. N. Haleole’s researches in the work and workings of the Sorcery priesthood, is a revelation of the power and influence of that body over the Hawaiian race in all their vocations, and through his connections with...

The mother being faint from unpleasant sensations, and groaning at the time, without appetite for food, they (the attendants) sought to ascertain her cravings. Then certain women came to her and asked, “What sort of illness have you that you hide yourself?” She said to them, “I do not know; (I am) simply languid. ” The women then said to her, “Let’s see; we will examine you. ” She took off her garment and they examined her body while one of the women took hold of and ...

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Hawai’I Island Legends : Pikoi, Pele and Others

By: Mary Kawena Puku'i

When Polynesian people came to Hawaii, hundreds of years ago, they brought legends. We know this because the same stories and similar hero names are found in other Polynesian groups. Other legends grew about historical events in our islands, about real people and places. Some are very old while others have grown in recent times. As all these stories were told and retold changes crept in. While the main story was the same, details became very different. No one can s...

"Why is that crowd down the valley Brother! What are all those people doing” Pikoi's brother was preparing food for the imu and did not hear the boy's question. Pikoi and his father had come from Kauai the day before. They had come to Manoa Valley on Oahu to visit a married sister. A crowd the very first day! Pikoi must find out what was going on. At first he went slowly down the trail, watching the people eagerly. He saw someone with a bow and arrows. Rat shooting...

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Punia

By: Lokahi Antonio

I ka poe heluhelu o ka Hoku Hawaii, eia makou ke hoopuka aku nei I keia wahi Moolelo Hoonanea, no ka pomaikai o ko ka Hoku poe heluhelu. He wahi moolelo kahiko keia no kela au kahiko o ka aina. A ua hoopuka aku makou i keia no keia mau pule e nee nei, me ka manaolana, ma ka hoomaka hou ana o keia makahiki ae, e oili aku ai ka “Moolelo Nani o Bene Ha”, a he moolelo hoi i hoopuka ia e kekahi kenelala kaulana o Amelika. Ua hoouna aku makou i ka puke o ia moolelo kaulana i A...

E noho ana ma kekahi wahi ma uka o Kohala, i kela au kahiko loa o ka aina, he kane me kana wahine. O ka inoa o ke kane, o ia no o Leimakani. A o ka inoa hoi o ka wahine, o ia o Hina. He loihi na la o ko laua noho ana me ka loaa ole o ka hua o ko laua noho hoao ana. O ka hana maamau i keia kanaka, o ia no ka mahiai uala ma uka paha o Honoipu. A o kana lawaia mau e hele ai, o ia no ka luu ula i kai o ia kahakai. Ia laua e noho ana me ka maikai, ua hoomaka maila o Hina e o...

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Ka Mo'Olelo O Lonoikamakahiki

By: Abraham Fornander

The Hale Kuamoo–Hawaiian Language Center supports and encourages expansion of Hawaiian language as the medium of education, business, government, and other contexts of social life in Hawaii. The Center provides professional and material resources necessary to address this goal including educational support in the development of curriculum materials for Hawaiian medium education, teacher training, Na Maka O Kana Hawaiian language newspaper, and the Mamaka Kaiao dictionary...

He Alii nui o Lonoikamakahiki no ka mokupuni o Hawaii ma hope iho o ko Keawenuiaumi make ana; he kanaonokumamaha hanauna maia Wakea mai. O Keawenuiaumi kona makua kane, a o Kaihalawai kona makuahine; ma Napoopoo kona wahi i hanau ai, a ma laila no o ia i hanai ia ai a nui, e kona mau kahu, e Hauna laua me Loli, a me ka laua wahine o Kohenemonemo. I ko Lonoikamakahiki wa opiopio, oiai ua hoomaka ae kona noonoo ana, i ia manawa nana aela o Lonoikamakahiki, e kau ana na me...

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He Mo'Olelo No 'Aukelenuia'Iku

By: Abraham Fornander

O keia moolelo o Aukelenuia iku, o ia kekahi o na moolelo kaulana loa ma Hawaii nei. O Kuaihelani ka aina. O Iku ke kane, he alii. O Kapapaiakea ka wahine. Na laua na keiki he umikumamalua. E hoomaka ana ka olelo ma Kuaihelani. Eia na inoa o na keiki: Kekamakahinuiaiku, Kuaiku, Nohoaiku, Heleaiku, Kapukapuaiku, Heaa iku, Lonoheaiku, Naaiku, Noiaiku, Ikumailani me Aukelenuiaiku. He mau kane, a me Kaomeaaiku, he wahine. O Aukelenuiaiku ka mea nona keia moolelo. Mai ka hia...

Ma anei e ike ai kakou i ka poino o Aukelenuiaiku a me kona pakele ana i ka make a kona kaikuaana huhu, aloha ole. A haule o Aukelenuiaiku i loko o ka lua, kahea iho ua kaikuaana huhu la, penei: “E Kamooinanea e, eia mai ko ai la, ai ia mai.” la ia e kahea ana, holo maila kekahi kaikuaana o Aukelenuiaiku (he kaikuaana aloha ia ia), kahea ihola ma ka waha o ka lua, “E Kamooinanea e, mai ai mai oe! O ko moopuna mai no, o Aukelenuiaiku e lele akula.” Ma keia haule ana o Auk...

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Lehua 'Ahihi

By: Kuleana Kope

He welina aloha i na kupa o ka aina e noho ana mai Hawaii Moku O Keawe, kahi e ike mua ia ai ka wehena kaiao, a i Niihau O Kahelelani, kahi e aui ai ka la i lalo o ka mole o Lehua. Ano, ke hoouna ia aku nei keia ohina moolelo o Lehua Ahihi i ka loa me ka laula o ko kakou paeaina, me ka manaolana e paipai a hoohoihoi i ka poe olelo Hawaii i ka heluhelu a pulama i na moolelo a na kupuna i waiho mai ai no kakou. Ma ko kakou noho ana he kanaka, ua nui na haawina o ka naa...

Aia ma ke komohana hema o ka mokupuni o Lanai, ma ka lihi kahakai, e ike ia aku no he wahi mokupuni puu pohaku pele ulaula e ku ohaoha ana ma luna o ka ilikai nona ke anawaena he kanaono kapuai, o kona kiekie hoi, he kanawalu kapuai. O ka mamao mai ka mokupuni aku o Lanai a hiki i ua wahi moku pohaku la, aia ma kahi o ke kanalima a kanaono anana, he kai hohonu ka mea nana i hookaawale ma waena o laua. O na aoao a pau o ua wahi mokupuni pohaku la, he mania pu e hiki ole a...

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Tales of the Menehune

By: Mary Kawena Pukui

These legends have been selected with the thought that, in length and content, they are suitable to be told or read to young children as well as to be read by older ones. Some are very old legends, common to many Pacific islands, and others are of recent origin. The menehune were the little people of Hawaiian tales. As they lived in the mountain forests and only came to the lowland at night, they were not often seen. Yet the Hawaiians could describe them. They were two ...

Laka stood among the great trees of the koa forest. "This is such a tree as my grandmother told me of," he thought. "It is straight and has grown strong fighting the mountain winds. Such a tree will make a strong canoe, one that can fight ocean waves." Then Laka prayed and went to work with his stone tool. All day he worked. At last the great tree fell, and Laka went home, tired but satisfied. "Tomorrow I shall trim off the branches," he thought. "I shall cut the log to...

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Ka Robina Gula (The Golden Robin)

By: Robina Gula

E hoomanao au i ka hua maikai,;He maha no no'u ma ke ao maluna'e;;He maha no no'u ma ke ao maluna'e.;;HUI—Mau, mau, he maha mau;No ka poe maemae ma na kula ao;;Ma na papu lai a olino mai,;Kahi ia e maha'i no ka poe maikai;;Mau, mau, he maha mau.;;2 A loa ke ala, a apuupuu no,;Akau mai na ino, a uhika po,;Epaa pono no ia olelo maikai,;E malu mai ana, a maha hou mai,;E malu mai ana, a maha hou mai.;;HUI—Mau, mau, he maha mau, &c.;;3 A popilikia, a paumako e,;Au ka waimaka,...

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Akhani Akhotdi : Kachhi Lok-Akhaniun Bhar 1

By: Manilal Gala

This is a book of folk tales in Kachhi language, spoken in western India (particularly in Kachh and Mumbai), containing 13 traditional tales recorded in various parts of Kachh and Mumbai. This is a part one of Kachhi Oral Tradition Project going on by Vadhod ji Padhrai, Patri Kachh.

hIkdo seth nen sethani va. vya phere laa. phere laa vya ta sammun bakrien vaaro aayo te. Bakrien vaaro Ichhio panwar chovaaje.

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Fifth International Anthology on Paradoxism

By: Florentin Smarandache

88 writers (in addition of folklore collections) from 23 countries with texts in 17 languages (English, Romanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Arabic, French, German, Hungarian, Tamil, Hindi, Indonesian, Hebrew, Italian, Urdu, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, Spanish) contributed poetry, essays, letters to the editor, arts, science, philosophy, short drama, short story, distichs, epigrams, aphorisms, translations, paradoxes, and folklore or found literature to the “Fifth international Anthology on Paradoxism”.

An Ode to Fuzzy & Neutrosophic Logic and their Creators When everything seems a murky mess And you are forced to second guess The way you are headed when you’re going straight And whether you’re there on time ’cause early may be late! When your eyes start playing tricks – it’s neither night nor day But the magic hour; when you just can’t for sure say The white from the black as mostly all is grey Take a moment to close your eyes and thank Zadeh! For inventing ...

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Paradoxism's Manifestos and International Folklore

By: Florentin Smarandache

The book is structured in two parts as follows: - in the first part, the theory of paradoxism through its first six published worldwide manifestos (1983, 1984, 1990, 1998, 2002, and 2010 respectively); - in the second part, the paradoxism collected from the international (English, French, Spanish/Arabic, and Romanian) folklore in images and paradoxist situations.

A) Folkloric Begining. It was in the years 1980’s when the paradoxist movement started. Together with childhood friends (I use their nicknames, since these are more colorfull: Cost, Geonea, Beca, Bigioc, Piciu, Boros, Covrig ăl mijlociu, Cris, Pilă, Chesa, Grasu, Babanu) in the little parks and restaurants of Bălcești – Vâlcea drinking beer and joking. They did not like to read or write!... They all were non-literators {excepting me and Co(n)st(antin) Dincă}. We built a...

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Caution : I Drive Like You Do! (Collection of American Paradoxist ...

By: Florentin Smarandache

I have collected this beautiful American Folklore - under the form of aphorisms - from car plates, from various anonymous postings, from expressions heard in my discussions, from e-mails received, etc. Computer jokes, life taken upside-down, job related reflections, family connections, inside-out clichés of language, and so on. They are in a paradoxist style, or close, and full of humor… Some of them are cascading Murphy’s Laws (pessimistically), others are opposite - li...

See a few nice examples from the book text: “I think, therefore I’m single”, “Life is short, break some rules”, or “Black Holes are Where God Divided by Zero”!

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Cine Râde la Urmă e Mai încet la Minte : Folclor Umoristic Interne...

By: Florentin Smarandache

Short stories and parables and matching images strewn together in a book.

-Nu fi de neînlocuit. Dacă nu poţi fi înlocuit, atunci nu o să fii niciodată promovat. -Cine crede în telekinezie, să îmi ridice mâna. -Nu sunt vegetarian pentru că iubesc animalele. Sunt vegetarian pentru că urăsc plantele. -Cum îţi dai seama când rămâi fără cerneală invizibilă? -Care este viteza întunericului? -De ce abreviere este un cuvânt atât de lung? -Intenţionez să trăiesc veşnic. Până acum sunt în grafic.

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Romance of the Three Kingdoms

By: Luo Guanzhong

Romance of the Three Kingdoms, written by Luo Guanzhong in the 14th century, is a historical novel set amidst the turbulent years near the end of the Han Dynasty and the Three Kingdoms era of Chinese history, starting in 169 CE and ending with the reunification of the land in 280 CE. The story (part historical, part legend, and part myth) romanticizes and dramatizes the lives of feudal lords and their retainers, who tried to replace the dwindling Han Dynasty or restor...

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