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DjVu Editions Classic Literature (83 Books)


The Djvu Collection offers about 250 eBooks. Each eBook was designed for an optimal eBook readership experience. The Djvu eBooks are available in either a PDF format or a Djvu format. The Djvu format is an innovate way to read eBooks through your Internet browser.

 
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A Midsummer Nights Dreame

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: A Midsommer Nights Dreame; Actus Primus -- Enter Theseus, Hippolita, with others. Theseus. Now faire Hippolita, our nuptiall houre Drawes on apace: foure happy daies bring in Another Moon: but oh, me thinkes, how slow This old Moon wanes; She lingers my desires Like to a Step- dame, or a Dowager, Long withering out a yong man?s revennew. Hip. Foure daies wil quickly steep the[m]selves in nights Foure nights wil quickly dreame away the time: And then the Moone, l...

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Much Adoe about Nothing

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: Much adoe about Nothing; Actus Primus -- Scena Prima -- Enter Leonato Governour of Messina, Innogen his wife, Hero his daughter, and Beatrice his Neece, with a messenger. Leonato. I learne in this Letter, that Don Peter of Arragon, comes this night to Messina. Mess. He is very neere by this: he was not three Leagues off when I left him. Leon. How many Gentlemen have you lost in this action? Mess. But few of any sort, and none of name. Leon. A victorie is twice i...

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The Tragedie of Othello, The Moore of Venice

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Tragedie of Othello, the Moore of Venice; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Enter Rodorigo, and Iago. Rodorigo. Never tell me, I take it much unkindly That thou (Iago) who hast had my purse, As if y strings were thine, should?st know of this. Ia. But you?l not heare me. If ever I did dream 8 Of such a matter, abhorre me. Rodo. Thou told?st me, Thou did?st hold him in thy hate.

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The Life and Death of King Richard the Second

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Life and Death of King Richard the Second; Actus Primus -- Scaena Prima -- Enter King Richard, John of Gaunt, with other Nobles and Attendants. King Richard. Old John of Gaunt, time- honoured Lancaster, Hast thou according to thy oath and band Brought hither Henry Herford thy bold son: Heere to make good y boistrous late appeale, Which then our leysure would not let us heare, Against the Duke of Norfolke, Thomas Mowbray? Gaunt. I have my Liege. King. Tell me...

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The Tragedy of Richard the Third

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Tragedie of Richard the Third with the Landing of Earle Richmond, and the Battell at Bosworth Field; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Enter Richard Duke of Gloster, solus. Now is the Winter of our Discontent, Made glorious Summer by this Son of Yorke: And all the clouds that lowr?d upon our house In the deepe bosome of the Ocean buried. Now are our browes bound with Victorious Wreathes, Our bruised armes hung up for Monuments; Our sterne Alarums chang?d to me...

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The Tragedie of Romeo and Juliet

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Tragedie of Romeo and Juliet; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Enter Sampson and Gregory, with Swords and Bucklers, of the House of Capulet. Sampson. Gregory: A my word wee?l not carry coales. Greg. No, for then we should be Colliars. Samp. I mean, if we be in choller, wee?l draw. Greg. I, While you live, draw your necke out o?th Collar. Samp. I strike quickly, being mov?d. Greg. But thou art not quickly mov?d to strike. Samp. A dog of the house of Mountague,...

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Sonnets

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: TO THE ONLIE BEGETTER OF THESE INSUING SONNETS, Mr. W.H.; ALL HAPPINESSE AND THAT ETERNITIE PROMISED BY OVR EVER-LIVING POET WISHETH THE WELL-WISHING ADVENTURER IN SETTING FORTH. T.T. SHAKESPEARES, SONNETS.

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The Taming of the Shrew

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Taming of the Shrew; Actus Primus -- Scaena Prima -- Enter Begger and Hostes, Christophero Sly. Begger. Ile pheeze you infaith. Host. A paire of stockes you rogue. Beg. Y?are a baggage, the Slies are no Rogues. Looke in the Chronicles, we came in with Richard Conqueror: therefore Paucas pallabris, let the world slide: Sessa. Host. You will not pay for the glasses you have burst? Beg. No, not a deniere: go by S[aint]. Jeronimie, goe to thy cold bed, and warme...

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The Tempest

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Tempest; Actus Primus -- Scena Prima -- A tempestuous noise of Thunder and Lightning heard: Enter a Ship- master, and a Boteswaine. Master. Boteswaine. Botes. Heere Master: What cheere? Mast. Good: Speake to th? Mariners: fall too?t, yarely, or we run our selves a ground, bestirre, bestirre. Exit. Enter Mariners. Botes. Heigh my hearts, cheerely, cheerely my harts: yare, yare: Take in the toppe- sale: Tend to th? Masters whistle: Blow till thou burst thy win...

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The Life of Tymon of Athens

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Life of Timon of Athens; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Enter Poet, Painter, Jeweller, Merchant, and Mercer, at severall doores. Poet. Good day Sir. Pain. I am glad y?are well. Poet. I have not seene you long, how goes the World? Pain. It weares sir, as it growes. Poet. I that?s well knowne: But what particular Rarity? What strange, Which manifold record not matches: see Magicke of Bounty, all these spirits thy power Hath conjur?d to attend. I know the Merc...

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The Lamentable Tragedy of Titus Andronicus

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Tragedie of Titus Andronicus; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Flourish. Enter the Tribunes and Senators aloft And then enter Saturninus and his Followers at one doore, and Bassianus and his Followers at the other, with Drum & Colours. Saturninus. Noble Patricians, Patrons of my right, Defend the justice of my Cause with Armes. And Countreymen, my loving Followers, Pleade my Successive Title with your Swords. I was the first borne Sonne, that was the last Tha...

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The Tragedie of Troylus and Cressida

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Tragedie of Troylus and Cressida; The Prologue -- In Troy there lyes the Scene: From Iles of Greece The Princes Orgillous, their high blood chaf?d Have to the Port of Athens sent their shippes Fraught with the ministers and instruments Of cruell Warre: Sixty and nine that wore Their Crownets Regall, from th? Athenian bay Put forth toward Phrygia, and their vow is made To ransacke Troy, within whose strong emures The rauish?d Helen, Menelaus Queene, With want...

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Twelfe Night, Or What You Will

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: Twelfe Night, Or what you will; Actus Primus -- Scaena Prima -- Enter Orsino Duke of Illyria, Curio, and other Lords. Duke. If Musicke be the food of Love, play on, Give me excesse of it: that surfetting, The appetite may sicken, and so dye. That straine agen, it had a dying fall: O, it came ore my eare, like the sweet sound That breathes upon a banke of Violets; Stealing, and giving Odour. Enough, no more, ?Tis not so sweet now, as it was before. O spirit of Lo...

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The Two Gentlemen of Verona

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Two Gentlemen of Verona; Actus Primus -- Scena Prima -- Valentine: Protheus, and Speed. Valentine. Cease to perswade, my loving Protheus; Home- keeping youth, have ever homely wits, Wer?t not affection chaines thy tender dayes To the sweet glaunces of thy honour?d Love, I rather would entreat thy company, To see the wonders of the world abroad, Then (living dully sluggardiz?d at home) Weare out thy youth with shapelesse idlenesse. But since thou lou?st; love...

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The Winters Tale

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Winters Tale; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Enter Camillo and Archidamus. Arch. If you shall chance (Camillo) to visit Bohemia, on the like occasion whereon my services are now on- foot, you shall see (as I have said) great difference betwixt our Bohemia, and your Sicilia. Cam. I thinke, this comming Summer, the King of Sicilia meanes to pay Bohemia the Visitation, which hee justly owes him. Arch. Wherein our Entertainment shall shame us: we will be justif...

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In Memoriam

By: Alfred, Lord Tennyson

Excerpt: PROLOGUE; STRONG Son of God, immortal Love, Whom we, that have not seen thy face, By faith, and faith alone, embrace, Believing where we cannot prove; Thine are these orbs of light and shade; Thou madest Life in man and brute; Thou madest Death; and lo, thy foot Is on the skull which thou hast made. Thou wilt not leave us in the dust: Thou madest man, he knows not why; He thinks he was not made to die; And thou hast made him: thou art just. Thou seemest human an...

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The Maine Woods

By: Henry David Thoreau

Excerpt: ON THE 31st of August, 1846, I left Concord in Massachusetts for Bangor and the backwoods of Maine, by way of the railroad and steamboat, intending to accompany a relative of mine engaged in the lumber-trade in Bangor, as far as a dam on the west branch of the Penobscot, in which property he was interested. From this place, which is about one hundred miles by the river above Bangor, thirty miles from the Houlton military road, and five miles beyond the last log-...

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Walden Or, Life in the Woods

By: Henry David Thoreau

Excerpt: WHEN I wrote the following pages, or rather the bulk of them, I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of Walden Pond, in Concord, Massachusetts, and earned my living by the labor of my hands only. I lived there two years and two months. At present I am a sojourner in civilized life again. I should not obtrude my affairs so much on the notice of my readers if very particular inquiries had not been m...

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Anna Karenina

By: Leo Tolstoy

Excerpt: Part I, Chapter 1; HAPPY families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. Everything was in confusion in the Oblonskys? house. The wife had discovered that the husband was carrying on an intrigue with a French girl, who had been a governess in their family, and she had announced to her husband that she could not go on living in the same house with him. This position of affairs had now lasted three days, and not only the husband and wife th...

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French Ways and Their Meaning

By: Edith Wharton

Excerpt: PREFACE; This book is essentially a desultory book, the result of intermittent observation, and often, no doubt, of rash assumption. Having been written in Paris, at odd moments, during the last two years of the war, it could hardly be more than a series of disjointed notes; and the excuse for its publication lies in the fact that the very conditions which made more consecutive work impossible also gave unprecedented opportunities for quick notation. The world s...

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