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DjVu Editions Classic Literature (83 Books)


The Djvu Collection offers about 250 eBooks. Each eBook was designed for an optimal eBook readership experience. The Djvu eBooks are available in either a PDF format or a Djvu format. The Djvu format is an innovate way to read eBooks through your Internet browser.

 
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The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

By: Conan Doyle

Excerpt: A Scandal in Bohemia; TO SHERLOCK HOLMES she is always the woman. I have seldom heard him mention her under any other name. In his eyes she eclipses and predominates the whole of her sex. It was not that he felt any emotion akin to love for Irene Adler. All emotions, and that one particularly, were abhorrent to his cold, precise but admirably balanced mind. He was, I take it, the most perfect reasoning and observing machine that the world has seen, but as a love...

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Middlemarch

By: George Eliot

Excerpt: Prelude; Who that cares much to know the history of man, and how the mysterious mixture behaves under the varying experiments of Time, has not dwelt, at least briefly, on the life of Saint Theresa, has not smiled with some gentleness at the thought of the little girl walking forth one morning hand-in-hand with her still smaller brother, to go and seek martyrdom in the country of the Moors? Out they toddled from rugged Avila, wide-eyed and helpless-looking as two...

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Silas Marner

By: George Eliot

Excerpt: PART I; CHAPTER I -- IN the days when the spinning-wheels hummed busily in the farmhouses--and even great ladies, clothed in silk and thread-lace, had their toy spinning-wheels of polished oak --there might be seen in districts far away among the lanes, or deep in the bosom of the hills, certain pallid undersized men, who, by the side of the brawny country-folk, looked like the remnants of a disinherited race. The shepherd?s dog barked fiercely when one of these...

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Far from the Madding Crowd

By: Thomas Hardy

Excerpt: Chapter 1; DESCRIPTION OF FARMEROAK -- AN INCIDENT -- When Farmer Oak smiled, the corners of his mouth spread till they were within an unimportant distance of his ears, his eyes were reduced to chinks, and diverging wrinkles appeared round them, extending upon his countenance like the rays in a rudimentary sketch of the rising sun. His Christian name was Gabriel, and on working days he was a young man of sound judgement, easy motions, proper dress, and general g...

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Tess of the Durbervilles

By: Thomas Hardy

Excerpt: Phase the First; The Maiden -- I -- On an evening in the latter part of May a middle-aged man was walking homeward from Shaston to the village of Marlott, in the adjoining Vale of Blakemore or Blackmoor. The pair of legs that carried him were rickety, and there was a bias in his gait which inclined him somewhat to the left of a straight line. He occasionally gave a smart nod, as if in confirmation of some opinion, though he was not thinking of anything in partic...

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The Scarlet Letter

By: Nathaniel Hawthorne

Excerpt: PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION; MUCH to the author?s surprise, and (if he may say so without additional offence) considerably to his amusement, he finds that his sketch of official life, introductory to THE SCARLET LETTER, has created an unprecedented excitement in the respectable community immediately around him. It could hardly have been more violent, indeed, had he burned down the Custom House, and quenched its last smoking ember in the blood of a certain vene...

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A Shropshire Lad

By: Alfred Edward Housman

Excerpt: I; FROM Clee to heaven the beacon burns, The shires have seen it plain, From north and south the sign returns And beacons burn again. Look left, look right, the hills are bright, The dales are light between, Because ?tis fifty years to-night That God has saved the Queen. Now, when the flame they watch not towers About the soil they trod, Lads, we?ll remember friends of ours Who shared the work with God. To skies that knit their heartstrings right, To fields that...

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The Bostonians

By: Henry James

Excerpt: Chapter 1; Olive will come down in about ten minutes; she told me to tell you that. About ten; that is exactly like Olive. Neither five nor fifteen, and yet not ten exactly, but either nine or eleven. She didn?t tell me to say she was glad to see you, because she doesn?t know whether she is or not, and she wouldn?t for the world expose herself to telling a fib. She is very honest, is Olive Chancellor; she is full of rectitude. Nobody tells fibs in Boston; I don?...

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The Golden Bowl

By: Henry James

Excerpt: PREFACE; Among many matters thrown into relief by a refreshed acquaintance with ?The Golden Bowl? what perhaps most stands out for me is the still marked inveteracy of a certain indirect and oblique view of my presented action; unless indeed I make up my mind to call this mode of treatment, on the contrary, any superficial appearance notwithstanding, the very straightest and closest possible. I have already betrayed, as an accepted habit, and even to extravaganc...

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The Portrait of a Lady

By: Henry James

Excerpt: CHAPTER 1; Under certain circumstances there are few hours in life more agreeable than the hour dedicated to the ceremony known as afternoon tea. There are circumstances in which, whether you partake of the tea or not--some people of course never do--the situation is in itself delightful. Those that I have in mind in beginning to unfold this simple history offered an admirable setting to an innocent pastime. The implements of the little feast had been disposed u...

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White Fang

By: Jack London

Excerpt: Part I, The Wild; The Trail of the Meat -- DARK spruce forest frowned on either side the frozen waterway. The trees had been stripped by a recent wind of their white covering of frost, and they seemed to lean toward each other, black and ominous, in the fading light. A vast silence reigned over the land. The land itself was a desolation, lifeless, without movement, so lone and cold that the spirit of it was not even that of sadness. There was a hint in it of lau...

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To Build a Fire : And Other Stories

By: Jack London

Excerpt: ?But I say, Kid, isn?t that going it a little too strong? Whiskey and alcohol?s bad enough; but when it comes to brandy and peppersauce and?--?Dump it in. Who?s making this punch, anyway?? And Malemute Kid smiled benignantly through the clouds of steam. ?By the time you?ve been in this country as long as I have, my son, and lived on rabbit tracks and salmon-belly, you?ll learn that Christmas comes only once per annum. And a Christmas without punch is sinking a h...

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The Call of the Wild

By: Jack London

Excerpt: BUCK did not read the newspapers, or he would have known that trouble was brewing, not alone for himself, but for every tide-water dog, strong of muscle and with warm, long hair, from Puget Sound to San Diego. Because men, groping in the Arctic darkness, had found a yellow metal, and because steamship and transportation companies were booming the find, thousands of men were rushing into the Northland. These men wanted dogs, and the dogs they wanted were heavy do...

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The Sea Wolf

By: Jack London

Excerpt: Chapter I; I SCARCELY know where to begin, though I sometimes facetiously place the cause of it all to Charley Furuseth?s credit. He kept a summer cottage in Mill Valley, under the shadow of Mount Tamalpais, and never occupied it except when he loafed through the winter months and read Nietzsche and Schopenhaver to rest his brain. When summer came on, he elected to sweat out a hot and dusty existence in the city and to toil incessantly. Had it not been my custom...

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Moby-Dick or the Whale

By: Herman Melville

Excerpt: Etymology (SUPPLIED BY A LATE CONSUMPTIVE USHER TO A GRAMMAR SCHOOL.); The pale Usher --threadbare in coat, heart, body, and brain; I see him now. He was ever dusting his old lexicons and grammars, with a queer handkerchief, mockingly embellished with all the gay flags of all the known nations of the world. He loved to dust his old grammars; it somehow mildly reminded him of his mortality.

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Areopagitica

By: John Milton

Excerpt: Areopagitica; A Speech for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing, to the Parliament of England () -- THEY, who to states and governors of the Commonwealth direct their speech, High Court of Parliament, or, wanting such access in a private condition, write that which they foresee may advance the public good; I suppose them, as at the beginning of no mean endeavour, not little altered and moved inwardly in their minds: some with doubt of what will be the success, oth...

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Paradise Lost

By: John Milton

Excerpt: BOOK I; Of Mans First Disobedience, and the Fruit Of that Forbidden Tree, whose mortal tast Brought Death into the World, and all our woe, With loss of EDEN, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful Seat, Sing Heav?nly Muse, that on the secret top Of OREB, or of SINAI, didst inspire That Shepherd, who first taught the chosen Seed, In the Beginning how the Heav?ns and Earth Rose out of CHAOS: Or if SION Hill Delight thee more, and SILOA?S Brook th...

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Paradise Regained

By: John Milton

Excerpt: THE FIRST BOOK; Who e?re while the happy Garden sung, By one mans disobedience lost, now sing Recover?d Paradise to all mankind, By one mans firm obedience fully tri?d Through all temptation, and the Tempter foil?d In all his wiles, defeated and repuls?t, And Eden rais?d in the wast Wilderness. Thou Spirit who ledst this glorious Eremite Into the Desert, his Victorious Field Against the Spiritual Foe, and broughtst him thence By proof the undoubted Son of God, i...

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Samson Agonistes

By: John Milton

Excerpt: Of that sort of Dramatic Poem which is call?d Tragedy; Tragedy, as it was antiently compos?d, hath been ever held the gravest, moralest, and most profitable of all other Poems: therefore said by Aristotle to be of power by raising pity and fear, or terror, to purge the mind of those and such like passions, that is to temper and reduce them to just measure with a kind of delight, stirr?d up by reading or seeing those passions well imitated. Nor is Nature wanting ...

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The Tragedie of Anthonie and Cleopatra

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Tragedie of Anthonie and Cleopatra; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Enter Demetrius and Philo. Philo. Nay, but this dotage of our Generals Ore- flowes the measure: those his goodly eyes That o?re the Files and Musters of the Warre, Have glow?d like plated Mars: Now bend, now turne The Office and Deuotion of their view Upon a Tawny Front. His Captaines heart, Which in the scuffles of great Fights hath burst The Buckles on his brest, reneages all temper, And i...

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