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Women Writers Collection (103 Books)


Women Writers Collection is a collection of the most influential works by women written in English from the seventeenth century through the nineteenth century. Many of these titles are considered to be part of the canon of today’s feminism movement.

 
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Homes and Heritage of the West Branch Valley

By: Junior League of Williamsport (Pa,)

Description: 56p. Illus map (on lining papers) 26 cm.

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Contemplation on Bassets-Down-Hill

By: Anne Kemp

Fiction

Excerpt: ? If that exact Appelles now did live. And would a picture of Elizium give; He might pourtrai' of the prospect which this Hill Doth shew; & make the eie command at will. Heer's many a shire whose pleasauntness for fight Doth yield to the Spectators great delight. Ther's a large Field guilded with ceres gold; Here a green mead doth many Heifers hold; Ther's pasture growne with virdant grass, whose store, Of Argent-sheep shewes th'owner is not poore. Here springs ...

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A Family Discussion between the King and the Queen Regent, His Mot...

By: Anonymous

Fiction

Excerpt: King: My good mother, why have you taken over the Regency when my father prohibited this at the time of his death? The Queen answers: Mon fils, pour estre la maitresse de toute la France sous vostre authorite.

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A Morning Walk

By: Eliza Lee Follen

Fiction

Excerpt: WE are apt to suppose that solitude is necessary for contemplation, that she cannot plume her wings except in the green shade; that the murmuring of brooks, and the melody of birds are her only proper accompaniment, or else that in the privacy of our chambers or the retirement of our studies, we must court her heavenly presence; but it is not so. The most active and unprepared scenes of life, the busy crowded street, is often the place for the deepest and the hi...

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A Poem Upon His Sacred Majesty, His Voyage for Holland

By: Alicia D'anvers

Fiction

Excerpt: D'anvers expresses her opposition to war and criticizes the French-Belgian alliance, claiming the two countries have made England bleed. A poem upon his sacred majesty, his voyage for holland: by way of dialogue, between Belgia and Britannia. By Mrs. D'anvers. Licens'd, December 23. 1690. J. F. London, printed for Tho. Bever, at the Hand and Star, Near Temple Barr, in Fleet-Street, MDCXCI.

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A Room of One's Own

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Excerpt: But, you may say, we asked you to speak about women and fiction--what, has that got to do with a room of one's own? I will try to explain. When you asked me to speak about women and fiction I sat down on the banks of a river and began to wonder what the words meant. They might mean simply a few remarks about Fanny Burney; a few more about Jane Austen; a tribute to the Bront‰s and a sketch of Haworth Parsonage under snow; some witticisms if possible about Miss Mi...

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A True Testimony from the People of God

By: Fell Fox and Margaret Askew

Fiction

Excerpt: Fell Fox: A true TESTIMONY, &c. To all the professed Teachers in the whole world, who go under the Name of Christians, and make a profession of Christ, who was offered up at Jerusalem, which the Scriptures declares of, whether they be Jesuits, Bishops, Priests, Protestants, Presbyters, In- dependents, Anabaptists, and to all sorts of Sects and Se- ctaries whatsoever; This unto you all, to prove, or disprove the Doctrine of the QUAKERS, which is the same with Chr...

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A Vindication of the Rights of Woman with Strictures on Political ...

By: Mary Wollstonecraft

Fiction

Excerpt: A BRIEF SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT. M. Wollstonecraft was born in 1759. Her father was so great a wanderer, that the place of her birth is uncertain; she supposed, however, it was London, or Epping Forest: at the latter place she spent the first five years of her life. In early youth she exhibited traces of exquisite sensibility, soundness of understanding, and decision of character; but her father being a despot in his family, and her mother one ...

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About Marrying Too Young

By: Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Fiction

Excerpt: Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton says: Girls do not reach their maturity until twenty-five, yet at sixteen they are wives and mothers all over the land, robbed of all the rights and freedom of childhood in marriage, crippled in growth and development; the vital forces needed to build up a vigorous and healthy womanhood are sapped and perverted from their legitimate channels in the premature office of production. When the body is overtaxed, the mind loses its tone, an...

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An Autobiography

By: Angel De Cora (Hinook-Mahiwi-Kilinaka)

Fiction

Excerpt: I was born in a wigwam, of Indian parents. My father was the fourth son of the hereditary chief of the Winnebagoes. My mother, in her childhood, had had a little training in a convent, but when she married my father she gave up all her foreign training and made a good, industrious Indian wife.

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An Essay on Translated Prose

By: Aphra Behn

Fiction

Excerpt: THE general Applause this little Book of the Discovery of several Worlds has met with, both in France and England in the Original; made me attempt to translate it into English. The Reputation of the Author, (who is the fame that writ, The Dialogues of the Dead,) the Novelty of the Subject in vulgar Languages, and the Author's introducing a Woman as one of the Speakers in these five different Discourses, were further Motives for me to undertake this little Work; ...

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An Expostulatory Appeal to the Professors of Christianity, Joined ...

By: Elizabeth Bathurst

Fiction

Excerpt: Ostensibly a Quaker entreaty to unite with God, it is primarily a defense of Bathurst's right to present her view of God's message. It having pleased the Lord (whose I am, and whom I serve) to call me by his Grace, even in my tender Years; by which Grace he put me upon early seekings after himself, that so I might know him the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom he hath sent, whom savingly to know is Life Eternal.

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An Indian Woman's Letter

By: Susette la Flesche

Fiction

Excerpt: Bibliography: Southern Workman and Hampton School Record 8 (April 1879): 44. The following is an extract from a letter from an Indian woman, a teacher among the Omaha Indians, to some friends in Philadelphia. The original is exceedingly well done and could not easily be surpassed by an educated white woman. After an interesting account of a Christmas tree supplied by the friends to whom she was writing, she says ...

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Anecdote of Elias Hicks

By: Lydia Maria Child

Fiction

Excerpt: The following anecdote was told to me by a member of the Society of Friends. It made a strong impression on my mind, because it shows so clearly the excellence of a bold meekness and Christian firmness in the discharge of duty; because it adds another fact to prove that he who trusts in moral power hath ever a brave indifference to threats of physical violence. When Elias Hicks was preaching in Virginia, many years ago, he took occasion to bear a powerful testim...

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Are Homogenous Divorce Laws in All the States Desirable?

By: Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Fiction

Excerpt: North American Review520 (March 1900): 405-9. There has been much discussion of late in regard to the necessity for an entire revision of the laws on divorce. For this purpose the State proposes a committee of learned judges, the Church another of distinguished bishops, to frame a national law which shall be endorsed by both Church and State. Though women are as deeply interested as men in this question, there is no suggestion that women shall be represented on ...

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Arrow Music

By: W. Bryher (Annie Winifred Ellerman)

Fiction

Excerpt: ARROW-MUSIC. Date:1922 An old Egyptian said: it is a dream which leads them, on toward Babylon, out toward the sea. A dream-- scorched on the wastes for a dream, scorched till the skin cracked under the helmet-rim, till we printed a way with bones for the swordsmen who followed us ... we died; but not for a dream.

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Between the Acts

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Excerpt: It was a summer's night and they were talking, in the big room with the windows open to the garden, about the cesspool. The county council had promised to bring water to the village, but they hadn't. Mrs. Haines, the wife of the gentleman farmer, a goosefaced woman with eyes protruding as if they saw something to gobble in the gutter, said affectedly: What a subject to talk about on a night like this!

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Bright Eyes

By: Susette La Flesche

Fiction

Excerpt: The chairman of the Board of Indian Commissioners says: Reservations are used for Indians very much as nurseries are used for children, as safe inclosures [sic] for the weak and defenseless. Does he call them safe inclosures [sic] because in them the Indians are powerless to help themselves when robbed? I know that hundreds of horses have been stolen from my tribe, the Omahas, and they cannot do a single thing to recover their property, punish the thieves or sto...

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Charity Bowery

By: Lydia Maria Child

Fiction

Excerpt: CHARITY BOWERY. By LYDIA MARIA CHILD. THE following story was told me by an aged colored woman in New Nork. I shall endeavor to relate it precisely in her own words, so often repeated that they are tolerably well impressed on my memory. Some confusion of names, dates, and incidents, I may very naturally make. I profess only to give the pith and marrow of Charity's story, deprived of the highly dramatic effect it received from her swelling emotions, earnest looks, and changing tones.

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Confessions of a Wife

By: Mary Adams

Fiction

Excerpt: THE night is wild and wet. It makes faces at me when I go to the window, like a big gargoyle; it has the dignity that belongs to ugliness and character. I 'm afraid I was born a heathen for beauty's sake; for all the Christian there is in me --and that is scandalously little--is kept busy going into sackcloth and doing penance for my esthetic sins. I have never loved any person who was not beautiful. But then I have never loved many people--Father, and poor Ina.

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