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The Inns and Taverns of Pickwick , With Some Observations on Their...

By: B.W. Matz

Preface: It is not claimed for this book that it supplies a long?felt want, or that it is at all necessary to the better understanding of the immortal work which inspired it. Nor does the author offer any apology for adding yet another volume to the long list of books, already existing, which deal in some way or other with England?s classic book of humour, because it isn?t so much his fault as might appear on the surface.

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Getting Gold

By: J.C.F. Johnson

Preface: Some six years ago the author published a small book entitled ?Practical Mining,? designed specially for the use of those engaged in the always fascinating, though not as invariably profitable, pursuit of ?Getting Gold.? Of this ten thousand copies were sold, nearly all in Australasia, and the work is now out of print. The London Mining Journal of September 9th, 1891, said of it: ?We have seldom seen a book in which so much interesting matter combined with usefu...

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The First Homily

By: Gregory Thaumaturgus

Excerpt: ON THE ANNUNCIATION TO THE HOLY VIRGIN MARY.(2) To?day are strains of praise sung joyfully by the choir of angels, and the light of the advent of Christ shines brightly upon the faithful. Today is the glad spring?time to us, and Christ the Sun of righteousness has beamed with clear light around us, and has illumined the minds of the faithful. To?day is Adam made anew,(3) and moves in the choir of angels, having winged his way to heaven. To?day is the whole circl...

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And the Dead Spake

By: E. F. Benson

By There is not in all London a quieter spot, or one, apparently, more withdrawn from the heat and bustle of life than Newsome Terrace. It is a cul-de-sac, for at the upper end the roadway between its two lines of square, compact little residences is brought to an end by a high brick wall, while at the lower end, the only access to it is through Newsome Square, that small discreet oblong of Georgian houses, a relic of the time when Kensington was a suburban village sunde...

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The Crime Oracle

By: Maxwell Grant

Excerpt: THE northbound elevated train rattled to a screechy stop. The gate of the last car swung open. A sallow, squint?eyed passenger stepped to the rough planking of the old station platform. Starting toward the exit, he paused to light a cigarette, while the train jolted away on its journey.

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O Pioneers

By: Willa Sibert Cather

PART I: The Wild Land ne January day, thirty years ago, the little town of Hanover, anchored on a windy Nebraska tableland, was trying not to be blown away. A mist of fine snowflakes was curling and eddying about the cluster of low drab buildings huddled on the gray prairie, under a gray sky. The dwelling-houses were set about haphazard on the ough prairie sod; some of them looked as if they had been moved in overnight, and others as if they were straying off by themselv...

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The Walking Woman

By: Mary Austin

THE first time of my hearing of her was at Temblor. We had come all one day between blunt whitish bluffs rising from mirage water, with a thick pale wake of dust billowing from the wheels, all the dead wall of the foothills sliding and shimmering with heat, to learn that the Walking Woman had passed us somewhere in the dizzying dimness, going down to the Tulares on her own feet. We heard of her again in the Carrisal, and again at Adobe Station, where she had passed a wee...

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The Occupant of the Room

By: Algernon Henry Blackwood

He arrived late at night by the yellow diligence, stiff and cramped after the toilsome ascent of three slow hours. The village, a single mass of shadow, was already asleep. Only in front of the little hotel was there noise and light and bustle—for a moment. The horses, with tired, slouching gait, crossed the road and disappeared into the stable of their own accord, their harness trailing in the dust; and the lumbering diligence stood for the night where they had dragged ...

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The Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus (Volume Ii)

By: Washington Irving

Excerpt: Book XI. Chapter 1. Administration of the Adelantado. Expedition to the Province of Xaragua. [1498.] Columbus had anticipated repose from his toils on arriving at Hispaniola, but a new scene of trouble and anxiety opened upon him, destined to impede the prosecution of his enterprises, and to affect all his future fortunes. To explain this, it is necessary to relate the occurrences of the island during his long detention in Spain.

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Ultima Thule

By: Henry Handel Richardson

Excerpt: I.i. WHEN for the third time, Richard Mahony set foot in Ausralia, it was to find that the fortune with which that country but some six years back had so airily invested him no longer existed. He was a ruined man; and at the age of forty?nine, with a wife and children dependent on him, must needs start life over again. Twice in the past he had plucked up his roots from this soil, to which neither gratitude nor affection bound him. Now, fresh from foreign travel,...

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Lodore

By: Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

In the flattest and least agreeable part of the county of Essex, about five miles from the sea, is situated a village or small town, which may be known in these pages by the name of Longfield. Longfield is distant eight miles from any market town, but the simple inhabitants, limiting their desires to their means of satisfying them, are scarcely aware of the kind of desert in which they are placed. Although only fifty miles from London, few among them have ever seen the m...

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The Theory of Business Enterprise

By: Thorstein B. Veblen

Preface: In respect to its point of departure, the following inquiry into the nature, causes, utility, and further drift of business enterprise differs from other discussions of the same general range of facts. Any unfamiliar conclusions are due to this choice of a point of view, rather than to any peculiarity in the facts, articles of theory, or method of argument employed. The point of view is that given by the business man?s work, the aims, motives, and means that con...

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Visions of the Daughters of Albion

By: William Blake

Excerpt: PLATE 3 The Argument I loved Theotormon And I was not ashamed I trembled in my virgin fears And I hid in Leutha?s vale! I plucked Leutha?s flower, And I rose up from the vale; But the terrible thunders tore My virgin mantle in twain.

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Daniel Deronda : A Conversation

By: Henry James

Excerpt: THEODORA, one day early in the autumn, sat on her piazza with a piece of embroidery, the design of which she invented as she proceeded, being careful, however, to have a Japanese screen before her, to keep her inspiration at the proper altitude. Pulcheria, who was paying her a visit, sat near her with a closed book, in a paper cover, in her lap. Pulcheria was playing with the little dog, rather idly, but Theodora was stitching, steadily and meditatively. ?Well,?...

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Dreams and Dust

By: Don Marquis

THIS IS ANOTHER DAY: I AM mine own priest, and I shrive myself Of all my wasted yesterdays. Though sin And sloth and foolishness, and all ill weeds Of error, evil, and neglect grow rank And ugly there, I dare forgive myself That error, sin, and sloth and foolishness. God knows that yesterday I played the fool; God knows that yesterday I played the knave; But shall I therefore cloud this new dawn o’er With fog of futile sighs and vain regrets? This is another day! And flu...

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The Black Monk

By: Anton Chekhov

ANDREY VASSILITCH KOVRIN, who held a master's degree at the University, had exhausted himself, and had upset his nerves. He did not send for a doctor, but casually, over a bottle of wine, he spoke to a friend who was a doctor, and the latter advised him to spend the spring and summer in the country. Very opportunely a long letter came from Tanya Pesotsky, who asked him to come and stay with them at Borissovka. And he made up his mind that he really must go.

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The Three Cities Trilogy : Lourdes

By: Emile Zola

Preface: BEFORE perusing this work, it is as well that the reader should understand M. Zola?s aim in writing it, and his views?as distinct from those of his characters?upon Lourdes, its Grotto, and its cures. A short time before the book appeared M. Zola was interviewed upon the subject by his friend and biographer, Mr. Robert H. Sherard, to whom he spoke as follows: ??Lourdes? came to be written by mere accident. In 1891 I happened to be travelling for my pleasure, with...

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Tales of New England

By: Sarah Orne Jewett

MISS TEMPY'S WATCHERS. The time of year was April; the place was a small farming town in New Hampshire, remote from any railroad. One by one the lights had been blown out in the scattered houses near Miss Tempy Dent's; but as her neighbors took a last look out-of-doors, their eyes turned with instinctive curiosity toward the old house, where a lamp burned steadily. They gave a little sigh. Poor Miss Tempy! said more than one bereft acquaintance; for the good woman lay de...

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When a Man Comes to Himself

By: Woodrow Wilson

It is a very wholesome and regenerating change which a man undergoes when he comes to himself. It is not only after periods of recklessness or infatuation, when has played the spendthrift or the fool, that a man comes to comes to himself. He comes to himself after experiences of which he alone may be aware: when he has left off being wholly preoccupied with his own powers and interests and with every petty plan that centers in himself; when he has cleared his eyes to see...

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The Wandering Jew, Volume 3

By: Eugène Sue

During the preceding scenes which occurred in the Pompadour rotunda, occupied by Miss de Cardoville, other events took place in the residence of the Princess Saint-Dizier. The elegance and sumptuousness of the former dwelling presented a strong contrast to the gloomy interior of the latter, the first floor of which was inhabited by the princess, for the plan of the ground floor rendered it only fit for giving parties; and, for a long time past, Madame de Saint-Dizier had...

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